Alarm box

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  #1  
Old 08-11-12, 02:29 AM
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Alarm box

Hi cam anyone help, i have fitted a i_on 30, my alarm bell box only has 4 wires to it how do i make them compatible please
 
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Old 08-11-12, 07:09 AM
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What's the make and model number of your panel?
 
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Old 08-11-12, 07:57 AM
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Typically, most european siren assemblies have the two power wires and two tamper switch wires (which should be identified on either the label on the device, or on the installation sheet). For 99% of typical residential installations, you can ignore the tamper switch (unless you are replacing an existing device that did have them connected to a security zone).

The other alternative is some alarm sounders have pairs of wires setup for in and out wiring for running multiple sounders. Again, this should be identified on your installation instructions.
 
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Old 08-27-12, 10:17 AM
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High all, I'm from across the pond, England.
Hope this is ok for my first post.

I'd like to correct something MrRonFL said here, "Typically, most European siren assemblies have the two power wires and two tamper switch wires"

For as long as I can remember we have always had a 4 wire system as mentioned by Ron, but, not used in the way mentioned.

Our 'bell box' has an electronic module with its own stand-by battery, wired as follows, 1. Neg (-) 2. (+) 3. Neg (-) Signal 4. (- or +) Tamper return.

1. & 2 : 12v DC (Hold Off) > if either of these is removed the 'bell' will sound.
3. Neg (-) Alarm signal from alarm panel (we call it an 'End station')
4. (- or +) Anti tamper return to alarm panel (selectable)

In addition we usually have a 5th wire to the module to trigger a Strobe light that used to continue after the end of the Bell Stop Timer, 15mins at to days regulations, this has changed recently to now stop with the bell.



 
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Old 08-27-12, 11:01 AM
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More than likely you are describing something like one of these Reson-8 siren assemblies: https://www.security.honeywell.com/u...)DS_LowRes.pdf

These are not uncommon in the UK and Europe (and there are several brands) but, when all is said and done, they are far from a standard siren. These are intended to be a bit more of a high security device.

Ultimately, for these you have to read the installation instructions and match the siren's connections with what the alarm control is capable of doing.
 
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Old 08-27-12, 11:10 AM
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Reason 8 is a totally standard siren, it even complies with one of the Standards that we have to follow as mentioned in the brochure you link.

EN50131-4 Security Grade 2, Environmental Class III.

Edit > Sorry I've just realised the Reason 8 is a Security Grade 2 sounder - for G1 & G2 use

Grades
G1. Low risk:
Not likely to be enforced in the UK as it covers DIY-style bells-only systems
G2. Medium risk:
This is first level that will be recognised by insurers and covers the majority of domestic & low value commercial premises. Required as a minimum for Police-calling systems
G3. Medium-high risk:
This covers most commercial & industrial premises, as well as high value domestic premises
NB G3 has to have a 5/6 digit EngCde
G4. High risk:
This is for high security applications, & roughly equates to the old BS7042 high security standard. Banks and above
 

Last edited by Menvier; 08-27-12 at 11:43 AM. Reason: I'm getting old, the memory is going!
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Old 08-27-12, 02:51 PM
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Not disagreeing with your assesment of your local installation standards. The whole point of my postings in these forums is that the information is generally in the installation manuals for the systems and devices, _and_ these are written with the assumption of basic understanding of electrical/electronic practices.

We can help interpret the info, but the person trying to do DIY installs has to meet us partway.
 
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Old 08-28-12, 12:03 AM
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Quote MrRonFL
"These are not uncommon in the UK and Europe (and there are several brands) but, when all is said and done, they are far from a standard siren. These are intended to be a bit more of a high security device."

They are not intended to be anything, they are an absolutely standard siren, as I said before.

I've been in this business for approx 40yrs so I do know a little about what I write. I never in all that time have seen a, bell, as it was all those years ago or a siren, as now, designed and/or installed in the 4way configuration you suggest we do as standard.

That was/is a totally insecure and backward way of doing things. Even our Grade 1 DIY systems use sounders of the type mentioned.

PS Nothing I have written is an assessment, it's how it is.
 
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