Cat setting off so called 60 pound motion?

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Old 11-16-12, 06:30 PM
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Cat setting off so called 60 pound motion?

Decided to install a Adt system on the house. It is the Honeywell lynx. Apparently the motion is supposed to be pet immune up to 60 lbs. well it's went off several times and I've had the tech come out twice for them to tell me "it shouldn't be going off" when I call the monitor station to cancel the alarm they tell me it must be the cat. Have they not perfected the motion technology? This cat weighs 10 lbs I'm guessing. When they came out to quote I told them about the cat.

if I can't use the motion then the system is pretty worthless to me. Any ideas?

Thanks for your inputs.
 
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Old 11-16-12, 06:46 PM
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Cats can and do set off motion sensors. I tell my customers to use partial arming with delay so that the alarm is active except for the motion sensor.
 
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Old 11-17-12, 05:31 AM
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I don't see where they can claim a weight differential for animals. I have two cats approximately the same size in structure. One is a Main Coon and weighs nothing compared to the box eared fighting cat who weighs 3 times her weight. He is a rock, she is hair. Motion is motion. Cats don't stay on floors. I'd take PJ's advice and disarm the motion detectors in the rooms the cats frequent during alarm times.
 
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Old 11-17-12, 06:36 AM
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Although many new motion detectors are "pet-immune", they are not pet proof. One of the many issues with cats setting off motion detectors is the furniture layout. To help eliminate false alarms, ensure that there are no objects that the cat can climb on withit 6' of the motion detector. Also, make sure that the motion detector is not pointed at a staircase. An empty hallway is typically a good location to mount a pet-immune motion detector in a home with a cat.
 
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Old 11-17-12, 06:54 AM
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I installed a motion sensor at the top of the stairway to the basement to control a light. It sees you approaching from top or bottom. I did this to save some juice rather than leave a light on 24/7. I save NOTHING. Every time I look, I see the light on. Stupid cats!
 
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Old 11-17-12, 07:25 AM
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The nice thing about wireless motions is that you can _move_ it.

The way a "pet immune" device works it that it simply doesn't see the zone from floor level up to about 3 feet high in the field of view. If you have an active animal climbs or jumps above that zone in the field of view of the motion, or if there is furniture that is a favored kitty lounge in that field of view, then you need to point the motion at a less problematic area.

ADT installers are also (for the most part) commissioned sales people. Their goal is to get in and out quickly with a signed monitoring contract (which is their actual profit). _Some_ of them really understand the technology, and proper device position and location; many don't.

The problem with their cheap installs is that they sell people on a couple of doors/windows, and then try to cover the rest with a motion or two.

Put contacts on the rest of your openings, and position the motion in a location like a hallway that's not prone to feline acrobatics.
 
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Old 11-17-12, 11:46 AM
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Thanks for all the advice. I'll have to move that motion that was covering an area I wanted covered. There's too much stuff for cats. If I would have known that I would have asked for more contacts or a smoke alarm instead. Is it possible for me to buy an additional sensor and add it to the system myself? I'm going to call and see what they can do first though. If they tell me it's going to be a couple hundred bucks I'm not going to be happy.
 
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Old 11-17-12, 02:36 PM
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It's not that difficult to add more transmitters. You can reliably buy them for $25-30 each.

The technical isn't really difficult. The trick is that you have to read your contract, _carefully_, some versions allow them to charge you more for more monitoring points; some exclude responsibility for devices not installed by an ADT tech; others insist that the ADT franchise still owns every thing until the initial term of the contract is complete.
 
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Old 11-18-12, 12:54 PM
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Pet immune PIRs can be programmed as non-PI -- might be worth checking.

Old school pet immunity is to mount it upside down a couple of feet above the floor.
 
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