Two motion sensors

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Old 04-03-16, 05:48 PM
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Two motion sensors

Can you wire two motion sensors to the same zone. They are both 4 wire 2 power and 2 for the zone. I did wire them in line but it gives a ( not ready ) for zone 3. One wire in from the panel to the first sensor then out to the other sensor then out to the panel. Or do you just hook them both right into the zone. I have a Ademco 4110 and no spare zone to use.
 
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Old 04-03-16, 07:11 PM
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The power gets connected + to + and - to -. The switch part of the detectors gets connected in series using the NC connections. When both detectors are normal the circuit is closed. When either one is triggered..... the circuit opens.

Does the zone you are using work properly ? If you short the point at the panel is the point normal ? The point may be programmed to need an EOL resistor in the NC switch line.
 
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Old 04-03-16, 07:33 PM
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How do you mean + to + both negative and positive are connected to the auxiliary output and yes it does use a resistor in line
 
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Old 04-03-16, 08:09 PM
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A little diagram. I didn't show the resistor but it needs to be in the zone loop.
The switch contacts can be both labeled NC or one C and one NC.

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Old 04-04-16, 09:03 AM
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Had to return the motion detector would work on my system I even hooked it up alone to try it then put my old one back up that does still work so the lines are good. What a waste of time found the same thing I have on eBay a 998 PIR.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 09:15 AM
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Amazon didn't put a model number in the ad just the brand It's a Ademco. When I opened it on the back of it is Honeywell with a picture below that X out its I think this is the model # K3119V3
 
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Old 04-04-16, 11:24 AM
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Most motion detectors connect the same way.

This is the terminal strip from the unit you linked to.

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1 and 2 are power.
3 and 4 are the NC loop.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 12:23 PM
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Yes that is the wiring schematic that came with the unit but the unit that came in the box was only 4 wire.. the ad say it was a Dual Zone to wrong unit in the box is all I can figure
 
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Old 04-04-16, 03:05 PM
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In any case, nearly all cases, motions (and glassbreaks) will have +/- power and C/NC alarm contacts. Higher end models may have a cover tamper switch (which you seldom need in a residential install) and sometimes will have terminals for an end of line resistor. All you _need_ are the basic 4 connections.
 
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Old 04-04-16, 09:08 PM
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I would personally advise doubling up on your door/window zones to free up a zone so each motion sensor can have its own zone. If you get an unexplained alarm (false alarm) on a motion zone, you want to know from the start which motion is causing it.

With unexplained alarms doors and windows, you can often shake, rattle, push, pull, or otherwise stress-test the openings to find which one is marginal.
You can't do that with motion sensors, where falsing is most often due to a transient infrared event in the environment, that isn't there when you're looking for what caused a motion to trip. In that case, you want to be examining ONE area for possible causes, not two or three.
 
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Old 04-07-16, 09:24 AM
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I need to get some resistors to do that I see that they are 1000 ohm but what watt are they or does it even matter. Mine have brown, black, red and gold stripes on them. I did test the ohm's they have 1000 ohm
 
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Old 04-07-16, 09:41 AM
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Really, for loop supervision, the wattage doesn't matter. I usually get 1/2 W, because the lead wires are a bit thicker than the 1/4 W, and closer to the gauge of the other wires (so the compression connections are better), and also less prone to breaking.
 
 

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