Replacing a Brinks BHS-4000b


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Old 12-27-16, 08:19 AM
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Replacing a Brinks BHS-4000b

We moved into a house recently that has a Brinks BHS-4000b security system with a Broadview BA 1677 keypad, which I think is a rebranded Brinks keypad, and a speaker. I want to keep it setup for the chime & alarm in case someone tries to break in, but I donít plan to have monitoring, at least in the short term. I have some questions that Iím not sure about (pictures attached too):
  1. Based on other posts, it seems like most of the sensors should just work with the new system (either a DSC or Ademco), except maybe the smoke detectors. Is that true? Is there a way to check the sensors?
  2. How can I tell if I have anything wireless connected?
  3. Can I reuse the wires to the sensors? It would be great if I didnít have to rewire anything.
  4. Can I reuse the wires to the keypad?
  5. Do either the DSC PC1832 or Ademco 20p mount into the same box as the BHS-4000b, or will I need a new box?
  6. I have a universal battery, can I reuse that?
  7. Should I watch for any features if I want to go with monitoring in the future?

I uploaded them to imgur too, they might be higher resolution there: Imgur: The most awesome images on the Internet
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Old 12-27-16, 06:13 PM
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The box may be a match for the standard Honeywell/Ademco mounting box, so you can _probably_ swap a Vista Board into it.

That said, swapping the can out is the _least_ of the work involved, so it's something of a minor consideration. Hardwired contacts are just dumb switches, so it they are in good condition, they will work just fine; and there is nothing special about the type of wire used. There may be one contact on each loop that has a resistor attached or possibly built in that you will need to track down, because the loop resistance will be the wrong value unless you swap the resistor for the ones that match the new system. This will take a little multi-meter detective work, and a bit of patience.

If none of your field devices have batteries, then you don't have wireless devices (they will be physically larger than the hardwired devices).

If your battery is less than 3 years old, go ahead and reuse it. Anything older than that may be functional, but is on borrowed time.
 
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Old 12-28-16, 08:01 AM
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Thanks for the info!

What resistance should I be looking for? If I was reading it correctly, I saw 3.5k resistance on a random sensor I measured.

It looks like I'll probably have to take a survey of the devices and track them down to check wireless. Is there a way to tell if my BHS-4000b supports anything wireless? If that's possible, it'd be easier to look in 1 place than all over the house. Also, I do have detectors in the doors, but I have no idea where. The only thing I can think of is something is hiding behind the door latch, or something was put in before the frame was painted, so I wouldn't know how to check for a battery there.
 
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Old 12-28-16, 02:05 PM
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If they used resistors on the loop, on a known closed loop, you would read 2000 ohms, or possibly 4700 ohms (+/- about 10% or so). I think this is one of the models that could be set for no resistors; so you may not have any at all (the closed loop would read fairly close to a short).

The door contacts are most likely in the door frame. Look for a 3/8" circle, usually in the header. If the frame's got several coats of paint, they may be hard to spot.
 
 

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