Vista 20P 5882 vs. 5883 Wireless Tranceiver

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  #1  
Old 03-24-17, 11:59 AM
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Vista 20P 5882 vs. 5883 Wireless Tranceiver

I have an ADT Safewatch 3000 / Vista 20P which came with my house, and have a ton of wireless sensors (nearly 30--mostly window sensors). I was thinking of switching from Alarm Relay to Comcast, and had a Comcast security tech come out to look at my system. He said my transceiver, which is a 5882, is not compatible with Comcast monitoring, and that I would need a 5881 (I have too many sensors) or a 5883. Anyone know if this is correct, or know the difference between the 5882 and the 5883? Google searches turned up nothing. It doesn't make sense to me as I would think Comcast would only care about the signal being sent to monitoring, but then again maybe they add some devices that only work with the 5883?

Of course he also told me that Comcast would force me to replace my wireless smoke detectors--and of course pay Comcast's inflated price for the replacements, which has me reconsidering the switch anyway, but regardless I'm curious about this 5882 versus 5883 question.

Thanks in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 03-24-17, 03:04 PM
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The 5882 is an older version; but I'm not sure what that has to do with the Comcast monitoring. The 5883 supports bi-directional devices; but again, I'm not sure what that has to do with their monitoring setup.

Here's the link to the product pages from Honeywell: https://www.security.honeywell.com/h...ver/index.html

5882 manual: http://www.info-techs.com/ademco/fil...iph/5881ii.pdf

What determines receiver capacity is the last letter of the part number. If it's an "H" it handles the max that your base system will support.

Are you sure you have a Safewatch 3000? The 5882 dates back a bit, and would have been on the earlier model (Safewatch 2000/Vista 20se).

Unless your wireless smokes are failing; they are just another zone on your system, and (again) have nothing to do with the monitoring side of the equation.

My gut check tells me that this is a bit of a sketchy up-sell...
 
  #3  
Old 03-25-17, 07:57 AM
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This is the first time I have seen someone want to switch from a reasonably priced monitoring service to a price gouging large corporation!

I have no idea why on earth you would want to do this? Get out your wallet is all I can say...
 
  #4  
Old 03-27-17, 12:46 PM
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I also would like to know why you'd want to switch to Comcast. I've heard nothing but bad things about people that have used them for monitoring service. In fact, I've heard of people that switch to them (they use some sort of iControl internet based device for monitoring) and then once they cancel and Comcast removes their device, the system that worked previously no long functions even locally.

Unless they offer something you can't get with your current company, or another company that supports your existing setup, I would not move forward with them if I were you.
 
  #5  
Old 03-28-17, 07:49 AM
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Well, I've had continuous problems with my system, and I was thinking they'd resolve it for me (boy was I wrong--they refused to do anything with a system that wasn't working). And with the quad play, their monitoring isn't all that expensive. Plus I was tempted by some of their video options, and the control via an app. However, I no longer plan to make the change given their smoke detector upsell, and that video monitoring is a lot more money.

None of my wireless sensors were working; a simple reboot solved that problem. I still don't have motion sensors that actually are pet sensitive (we have two goldens)--so I would like to fix that, and be able to arm my system with motions even with the dogs home--probably a pipe dream though. But, is there a simple way to control your Vista 20p with an app?

And yes, I'm certain this is a Safewatch 3000 / Vista 20p.

Thanks for all the help!
 
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Old 03-28-17, 08:07 AM
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What does it say on the PROM chip in the middle of your green circuit board? It should be on a white sticker starting with 'WA'.

As for the pet immune motion detectors, what model number motion detectors are you using now and how large are the dogs and do they jump on furniture that's within 6' radius of the motions?

The wireless troubles may come back up if all you did was power cycle the system as if it was RF supervision troubles, a reset clears the trouble and if the sensors are still not being "seen" by the panel's receiver, you'll probably get the troubles again 12 hours after the reset.
 
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Old 03-28-17, 08:11 AM
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WA3001-1.6
Copyright
Pittway 2001
TMC Rev. 1.6

Reset was probably a week ago. A lot of my sensors are having low battery warnings, so I've been gradually replacing them, but otherwise no issues.

Pets are both female goldens; one about 60lbs, the other is petite at about 45. I'll have to try to figure out what motion I bought, but it's in a foyer, aimed perpendicular to a flight of steps such that the steps might be in the peripheral detection area.
 

Last edited by tleithead; 03-28-17 at 09:59 AM.
  #8  
Old 03-28-17, 10:00 AM
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Unfortunately, that panel is too old to support Honeywell's Total Connect 2.0 service. How is it being monitored now (phone line and/or alarm communicator)?

That's a good sign that you haven't had any issues and that you are replacing batteries on all wireless zones that reported a low battery trouble. The low battery may have caused weak signaling.

If the motion looks at the stairs, the dogs going up the stairs would most likely cause a false alarm each time. It's best to have it so that there's nothing the dogs could jump on within a 6' radius of the motion and no stairs in the line of sight of the motion that the dogs could walk up.
 
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Old 03-28-17, 01:53 PM
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It's monitored via a phone line. What is an "alarm communicator?"
 
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Old 03-28-17, 02:03 PM
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Phone line alarm monitoring is very unreliable these days as alarm systems are designed to send analog signals over an analog phone line. Phone lines these days are almost always digital and even if you have an analog copper line at your home still, it's very likely that one of the switches from the phone company along the path from your home to the central station is digital in which case, it's as if you have a digital phone line in your home.

An alarm communicator is an internet or cellular (or both) device that you connect to the system to pass digital signals over a digital path to avoid loss of signals or incorrect signals received at the central station.
 
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Old 03-29-17, 12:30 PM
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When you say unreliable; are we talking relative to enterprise standards, or true home use? I can't say I've had any reliability issues with dialing the alarm company.

We have FIOS, so our home phone is certainly IP based. Is it worth me upgrading my Vista 20P and getting a communicator? If so, thoughts on a new circuit board for the Vista versus a whole new alarm? When I first moved here I nearly bought an Elk M1, but couldn't convince the boss it was worth the money.
 
  #12  
Old 03-29-17, 01:07 PM
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Well FIOS is certainly better than other phone services.

As you can see at https://forums.verizon.com/t5/Home-P...IP/td-p/482593 there's some confusion about whether or not FIOS is VOIP or not.

I won't pretend to be a phone expert so I can't really comment more on how reliable FIOS is compared to other phone services but I do know that an alarm communicator that sends an IP and/or cellular signal to a managed network control center before being sent to the central station is faster and more reliable than phone line service.

I'll let others who know more about the different phone services comment as to whether or not it's worth upgrading your system to use a communicator like I've mentioned or if the FIOS phone is reliable enough.
 
  #13  
Old 03-29-17, 04:36 PM
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FIOS is significantly better than most in emulating an analog landline. The problem that people have is that from region to region, even small differences in things like the phone adaptor used by the service provider has a noticeable effect on alarm communications.
 
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