NX8-V2 dialer over VOIP

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Old 09-08-17, 10:04 AM
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NX8-V2 dialer over VOIP

Hello to all. We use NX8-V2 in a hospital as panic alarms and intrusion alarms to dial to the police dispatch in the hospital. Does anyone know if it is possible for the NX8-V2 to be wired to dial through Voice Over IP (VOIP)? By way of 3rd party equipment, as of now, GE does not have any accessories able to do this.
Thanks for any help.
 
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Old 09-08-17, 11:05 AM
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Alarm signals are not reliable when connected using VoIP.

Rather then using a dialer you would need to use a network interface module where the signals are carried as data thru the local network. You need to talk with the service company that services the police dispatch desk. See if their receivers can monitor signals from the network.

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Old 09-09-17, 09:52 AM
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"Alarm signals are not reliable when connected using VOIP."

Is this accurate?

AT&T is replacing ALL its copper with VOIP on fiber. They often still make the connection "look like" copper, but the facade is crumbling quickly. The transition (from copper to fiber) used to be at the phone company's CO, then it moved to neighborhood DSLAMs, now it's at the ONT/Gateway at the customer premises, whether home or business "lines." Anecdote is not data, but I've had no issues at all with my old copper DSL (at least to the DSLAM) or my newish VOIP. Neither has anyone I know who has undergone a similar transition in the last few years. I'm thinking it isn't your father's VOIP anymore.
 
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Old 09-09-17, 11:03 AM
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Alarm communications over digital derived phones has been a bit of a crapshoot. The quality of the adaptor makes a difference, as does the reliability of the broadband network. The most important thing, even when it works, is that the broadband to analog adaptor has to have as much battery backup as the alarm system does.

They are still evolving, and the alarm industry is trying to find stable solutions, but alarm tech changes at a fairly glacial pace...
 
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Old 09-09-17, 11:10 AM
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The signals that leave the panel are 100% analog when using the dialer. Over copper the signals remained pretty much intact. Now... with VoIP.... those signals are compressed and digitized. The signals are no longer clean and 100% usable. Basically the central station gets un-readable signals.

Verizon FiOS is excellent for sending alarm signals thru. Their digital voice service is almost perfect. All my alarm systems reporting thru FiOS are fine. Some of the cable companies are ok but borderline. Three maybe four out of five attempts may make it thru.

We have been switching our accounts to network communication directly thru the internet with cellular or mesh radio back-up.
 
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Old 09-09-17, 11:18 AM
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@MrRonFL Agree with "glacial pace" of alarm tech.

@Pjmax Wow! "Compressed and digitized," huh? So "no longer CLEAN and 100% usable"? Reminds me of the crappy CDs that came after vinyl LPs. I'm thinking you don't really know much about A/D and D/A conversion. Would I be correct? At any rate, if you guys are finally getting around to direct IP comm, so much the better. Like Ron said, "glacial"...
 
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Old 09-09-17, 09:56 PM
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One of the things that makes the adoption of new tech slow, is the sheer cost. It costs 10s to 100s of thousands of dollars to obtain or alter a UL listing; which has to happen for every change made to most alarm technology. That's why many of the alternate communication devices specifically say that they are not UL listed.
 
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Old 09-10-17, 05:50 AM
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Pretty much anyone can start a VoIP telephone service, the reliability and level of service however is questionable with the fly-by-night companies. VoIP uses several different codexes in digitizing and compressing the data and some work better than others in analog alarm systems. The better VoIP providers, most of the big names in the business, DO work well with alarms as well as fax services but I feel it is my duty to point out that taken as a whole the analog alarm over VoIP service is not totally reliable.

Those companies that have high-cost adapters using the most reliable software and dedicated Internet connections will have the highest reliability. That the major telecommunications companies are all switching to fiber optic over copper is not something to worry about, in my opinion, as they will still be providing a high quality and reliable connection. It is the smaller (shoestring expenses trying to make a fast buck) VoIP providers over general usage Internet connections that are, and will continue to be problematic.
 
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Old 09-10-17, 07:24 AM
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@MrRonFL Yup, whenever there's a massive market/tech FUBAR, you can always find a regulatory agency responsible. Europeans have the new high-beams on their cars that detect oncoming vehicles and shield them from the beam while keeping everything else illuminated. Also, firm application of brakes causes brake lights to flash with frequency proportional to braking force. Oh, and rear fog lights to prevent rear-end collisions in inclement weather. All outlawed and thus unavailable in the USA due to U.S. Dept of Transportation regulations and certification procedures.

@Furd, Yup, fly-by-night outfits (corner cutters by definition) might not be the best choice to support any part of one's critical communication functions.
 
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Old 09-10-17, 10:31 AM
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UL isn't a regulatory agency. It 's totally an artifact of the insurance industry.
 
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Old 09-10-17, 10:41 AM
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I've dealt with UL testing and certifications all my professional life. Massive bureaucracy concerned exclusively with promulgating mountains of standards, regulations, and procedures which are then mandated and imposed on companies by industry associations. Just because an organization isn't a direct arm of government doesn't mean its actions don't have the force and effect of law. In the American marketplace with UL, it sure as hell does.
 

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Old 09-10-17, 10:54 AM
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Still had to make it clear that UL and NFPA are NOT arms of government. State and local governments specify and adopt their standards; but they are still private organizations.
 
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Old 09-21-17, 11:01 AM
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thanks for all your help! much appreciated
 
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