Entry 2 timer bypass entry 1 timer?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-10-19, 06:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Entry 2 timer bypass entry 1 timer?

Hey Guys, I have a vista 20p and have my garage on entry 1. Entry door from garage to house is entry 2. I want the garage to have a long timer and the entry door to have a short timer. Iíve tried a few different configurations but canít make it work. Currently when we enter through the garage with the long timer that long timer still exists once we enter the entry door. Once we enter through the garage and then open the entry door I want the short entry 2 timer to start. So basically I want the entry 2 timer to bypass the entry 1 timer once entry 2 door is opened. Is this possible?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-11-19, 06:49 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 16,076
Upvotes Received: 21
No, once the first timer to be activated starts, it keeps running until it runs out, or is disarmed; it won't switch over to the second timer.
The first zone violated has priority.

These are fairly simple devices, in terms of their internal logic.
 
  #3  
Old 05-13-19, 05:03 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Ok, thanks for the reply, I appreciate it. I'm starting to see these are pretty basic. I had a Caddx NX8 in my last house, which was quite a long time ago, and figured technology would of caught up with these. But then again I guess the Vista I have isn't new tech either.
Any advanced panels out there that you know if with a bit more tech? I couldn't find any when I was looking for my latest panel so settled with the Vista.
 
  #4  
Old 05-13-19, 05:34 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Also, do you happen to know if any other panels out there have separate timers for entry 1 and 2? Once someone enters the house door (entry 2) I want a short timer. I hate being left with that long garage timer (timer 1) but I need it long to get the car into the garage.
I thought my old Caddx had two totally separate timers but I could be wrong.
 
  #5  
Old 05-13-19, 03:09 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 16,076
Upvotes Received: 21
The alarm industry is notoriously conservative, and rarely makes more than incremental changes.

Nearly every brand has two separate entry timers, but they _all_ work like this. I'm not sure why this is an issue. Once you enter the garage, and then open the walk through door; I assume that you will be disarming, immediately; so it shouldn't matter which timer is the one actually running.
 
  #6  
Old 05-20-19, 06:51 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Yeah I have a long timer for the garage door, to give us time to get the car in and exit the car and get in the house. The entry into the house is short. If a burglar was to enter the garage they'd have that long timer to be able to quickly get into the house and possibly disarm or dismantle the system before that long timer expired, or possibly make their way to the family. I want the entry door to be short so no matter what someone only has like 30 seconds to shut off the system.
But I understand what you're saying and we'll just have to live with the way its set up. I'll just shorten the garage timer.
 
  #7  
Old 05-20-19, 10:12 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 898
Upvotes Received: 11
I hesitated to bring this up, but if that long garage door time delay bothers you so much----

There is a sort'a kludge solution that we used occasionally back in the old days before control panels became as sophisticated as they are now. It entails reprogramming the garage door zone as Type 3 (Instant Perimeter), and installing an independent shunt timer relay module that is activated when the garage door opener is activated.

The timer relay shunts the overhead door contact, meaning the control panel never sees the door open during the independent relay time; and the garage-to-house door opening is the only system delay triggered when that door opens, and gives you your short time delay to disarm, regardless of the extended independent delay still running on the garage door.

It entails running some wire to the garage door contact (or to the loop of that zone if the EOL Resistor isn't installed on the contact itself); and wiring the relay contacts in parallel with the zone. You can buy a timer relay module for $15 or less at eBay or Amazon, if you're interested. An Altronix 6062 model is as good a place as any to start shopping.
 
  #8  
Old 05-24-19, 12:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Nevada
Posts: 74
Upvotes Received: 1
I disarm with a key fob while I'm still in the driveway, before I open the garage door.

Who wants to race into the house to disarm the alarm at a keypad?

I mounted the LED from a CE3 into the frame of the garage door to remind me that I need to disarm the alarm before opening the garage door.

You could also use a home automation system to automatically disarm your system using geolocation (either detect your phone on home wifi, or your phone provides its location to your HA system via an app ). I prefer manual control over my alarm, so I don't use this, even though I am running Home Assistant in all our homes, and it's capable of disarming my alarm via Total Connect.
 
  #9  
Old 05-27-19, 08:06 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Two great suggestions guys! I appreciate it. Thanks I'll look more into those. I was interested in a fob before but was worried that a burglar could find it and disarm the system when they got in. But I guess we'd just need to make sure we hide our keys.
 
  #10  
Old 05-27-19, 03:39 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Nevada
Posts: 74
Upvotes Received: 1
I don't worry about this in either of our homes. Because the way they're laid out, keys are kept far from an entry point. And good luck ever finding anything in my wife's purse. However, you bring up a good point, especially if you have a table or similar near your front door where everyone puts their keys, wallet, etc.

With the programmability of the Honeywell system, you could make the "disarm" button a panic alarm, and use an arming button, or an unlabeled two-button combo for disarm. You could program it so every single button was a panic alarm button.
 
93CBRA voted this post as helpful.
  #11  
Old 06-03-19, 06:35 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Ok that would work for sure, didn't know you could program the buttons like that!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes