Upgrading Vista AT 4140 to V20P (without any experience)

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  #1  
Old 07-15-19, 05:56 PM
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Upgrading Vista AT 4140 to V20P (without any experience)

I'm doing a lot of reading (and thank you so much to all the great contributors here) and trying to decide if embarking on a self-upgrade of a 4140 (not XMP) to a V20P and adding in a couple new 6160V consoles is a manageable undertaking for someone with zero experience in alarms or low-voltage work. I have plenty of experience programming devices (FPGA, processors, etc..) but I don't think that'll come in handy too much here.

The panel was installed in 1989 and is hardwired to a number of IR sensors, smoke/heat alarms, door contacts and has 9 zones (attaching photos). It's been unplugged since we moved in. I've found a good post on taking over the system and plan to do that, validate all is working well (it was active as of a few months ago), and then do the upgrade.

My main goals in doing this are to 1) enable voice announcement of a specific door being opened (have a toddler and a pool..), 2) enable remote / mobile arming and disarming. I'm not planning on monitoring at the moment.

Question #1 - Is this feasible given very little experience with alarms and low-voltage work?
Question #2 - My hope is that this is pretty close to "label all the wires, replace the board with V20P, put the wires back according to the labels, reprogram zones, etc..".. how far off am I?

If this is is a fools-errand, perhaps someone could point my to a decent installer in the Chicago area who would work with me to do this, rather than sell me on some expensive, proprietary stuff..

Thanks!


 
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Old 07-15-19, 07:03 PM
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Well, you have one critical thing already sorted our. You have a clear list of what the existing zones are. The hardest thing about doing this, especially with a dead system is getting that information.

The part that will take a bit of untangling is the set of relays that have been added to the system. Those could be doing nearly _anything_.

With a package wire markers, that you can get from any home center, it's really not a super difficult project. Just keep good notes as you disassemble the existing system.
 
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Old 07-15-19, 07:20 PM
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Thank you! Is that what the first photo is, the relays? I couldn't quite figure out what that board was, thought maybe it was a weird looking transformer. I realize you said the relays could be used for anything, but what are the usual reasons someone would use that approach?
 
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Old 07-16-19, 02:20 AM
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Your angles don't give a good view, but the small board below the main board could be a power supply, and the stuff mounted on the door is most likely relays (part numbers would help).

Every one of these is essentially a custom installation, and, especially on older installs, these kind of add on boards are fairly common.
 
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