Change From Wired to Wireless Security

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-09-19, 03:07 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 20
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Change From Wired to Wireless Security

Changing from hardwired to wireless question. Are they both equal in protection? Any suggestions for a small system (3BR ground floor condo), combining entry sensors, glass breakage, motion sensors, panic button, and siren/horn, that can be self installed? Don't know if a specific system can be mentioned, but a comment on Simplsafe would be appreciated.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-09-19, 05:06 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 16,327
Received 38 Votes on 37 Posts
Wireless can be extremely reliable. In the long run, wired is still going to be the better install, but most modern wireless is pretty good.

I primarily deal with commercial security, so the mass market wireless systems like Simplisafe aren't really something I work with, much. Perhaps some other users can give you a better perspective.
 
  #3  
Old 10-10-19, 10:07 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 9
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
What do you mean changing from a hardwired to wireless system? Do you currently have a hardwired system installed? Are you moving to a new house and installing a brand-new system?

Hardwired systems are more robust and work better with 3rd devices. For example, you can pair a Honeywell Vista 20p with an Envisalink 4 and get remote interactive control and text/email alerts without a monthly fee. AIO (All-In-One) wireless systems aren't compatible with 3rd party modules. You're pretty much limited to what's available from the manufacturer. Hardwired systems will work with hardwired sensors from just about any manufacturer, however, when it comes to wireless sensors you will be limited to sensors that are sold by that manufacturer (there are a few exceptions).

If you don't want to run wires than you're probably going to be better off with a wireless system. Personally, I would stay away from systems like SimpliSafe. SimpliSafe is attractive because their monitoring is cheap, and they don't lock you into a contract. However, what they fail to mention is that their equipment is proprietary, and it only works with their service. So, if you cancel because you don't like their service, the hundreds of dollars you spent on that system just went down the drain. SimpliSafe also does not have a huge lineup of sensors, your choices are extremely limited when compared to a professional system (no dual tech motion detectors, recessed contacts, outdoor sensors, etc, etc). If you browse the SimpliSafe forums it also appears their customer service is slow to respond.

I would stick with a professional grade wireless system like a Honeywell Lyric, 2GIG GC3e, or a Qolsys IQ Panel. These systems are better quality and have a better selection of sensors. Any of the above-mentioned systems can be professionally monitored by any central station that supports Honeywell's Alarmnet or Alarm.com services.

AlarmGrid is an alarm company that provides no contract monitoring services to DIYers. They support all the alarm panels mentioned above and have tons of installation videos on their YouTube channel. They also provide support over the phone. The advantage to using one of these professional systems is that you have a huge selection of sensors and you can choose any monitoring company you prefer. For example, if you decided that you don't like AlarmGrid anymore, you could cancel and switch to another company like GeoArm or Alarm Relay while keeping all your original equipment.

I personally prefer the Honeywell Lyric over the other two but that's just my opinion. You should do a decent amount of research before you make a purchase.

I also prefer AlarmGrid as I feel their support is superior, however, their monitoring cost is more expensive than GeoArm and Alarm Relay.
 
Zorfdt voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 10-14-19, 07:28 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 20
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Very good information. Thank you.

I currently have the FA168CP Controller with 6 zones, 3 entry doors, & 9 window sensors, all hard wired.

New window installers screwed up some wiring and the controller was also doing weird stuff. Some wires are too short to reconnect. Not sure if I want to open the the wall to fix the wiring.

I have a new FA168CP complete panel, but fear the coding requirement after switch out and trying to fix the wiring problem.

Still trying to decide.
 
  #5  
Old 10-14-19, 01:35 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 9
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
That panel is a First Alert branded Honeywell Vista. Personally, I would swap it out with the newest revision Vista panel (Vista 20p Rev. 10.23) and purchase a 6160RF keypad. The RF keypad is a keypad and wireless transceiver built into one. This will allow you to add wireless sensors to your system. If you don't want to fix the existing wiring, just reuse the hardwired zones that are in good operating condition and replace the damaged zones with wireless sensors.

If you want the system to be professionally monitored, I would recommend the Honeywell LTE-IV (Verizon) or Honeywell LTE-IA (AT&T). Those communicators are dual path and transmit over the internet as a primary path or LTE as a backup. I would personally stay away from the communicators that require power from the ECP bus like the LTE-XA.

If you don't want professional monitoring, then you could purchase the Envisalink 4 for $100.00 and have remote interactive services and text/email alerts without a monthly fee.

You can find a combo deal Honeywell Vista 20p board and 6160RF keypad for about $160.00 online.

I'm not aware of any coding requirements that would prohibit a homeowner from fixing their hardwired zones, however, I don't know what your local codes prohibit.
 
  #6  
Old 10-14-19, 04:38 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 16,327
Received 38 Votes on 37 Posts
I suspect that the OP's primary hesitation for "coding" is the programming configuration.

_That_ is going to be a learning curve, no matter what brand or model that is chosen.

The advice for the Vista 20p and the RF Model keypad is pretty sound, and lets you keep what works, and ditch the damaged stuff.
 
  #7  
Old 10-17-19, 11:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 9
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
True, I don't know why I thought of building codes lol.

Programming the Vista 20p is actually pretty easy once you have an understanding of how it works. My suggestions to arky41 is go to AlarmGrid's website and download the programming manual for the 20p and read over it. They also have YouTube video's which can help you.

Whatever you don't understand you can also ask the question on this forum and we can help you. Switching your system out to a fully wireless system would be a downgrade.
 
  #8  
Old 10-21-19, 08:57 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 20
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for all the good info. I'm currently working, slowly, on the wiring repair. I will report when completed and go from there.
 
  #9  
Old 11-02-19, 09:25 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 20
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Update: Changed all the contact switches in the affected zone. Checked continuity on all 6 switches with windows closed and all showed closed. I still have a fault in the zone. That zone has (4) in a sun room and (2) in a back bedroom. Is there a way to bypass the zone to check the board? I'm trying my best to not have to replace the board even though I have a new exact replacement on hand. Don't relish the programming nightmare.
 
  #10  
Old 11-02-19, 08:52 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 16,327
Received 38 Votes on 37 Posts
Put a 2000 ohm (red black red on the first three stripes) resistor from the common to the zone input at the mother board terminals. If the zone closes, then the problem is with the field wiring.
 
  #11  
Old 11-12-19, 03:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 20
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have a field wiring problem. It looks as if 6 window switches are in series. Now I have to isolate the bad one(s). Cut the connections one at a time at the panel.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: