Cellular Communicator External Antenna


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Old 10-28-20, 07:46 PM
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Cellular Communicator External Antenna

Got my new cellular communicator connected and programmed. It is a Honeywell LTE-XA. I asked the central station to run a signal level check as we are on the outside area of cell phone coverage for AT&T. It looks like I have a solid 2 bars except during some recent bad weather we only had one bar. The manual shows a green OK for signal at 2 bars. I would like to add an external antenna. Looks like a female u.fl type micro connector on the circuit board. Can anyone suggest an antenna source? The unit is wall mounted about one foot from the ceiling. Right above the ceiling is the attic space. There is about ten feet to peak of the roof. I could mount the antenna anywhere in the space.
 
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Old 09-08-21, 07:41 AM
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Tool pics.

 
ruauu2 voted this post useful.
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Old 10-28-20, 08:15 PM
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You're not always assured a stronger signal with an external antenna. Location is important.
Basically there is an adapter cable, a cable to reach the antenna and the antenna.

Alarmgrid goes thru list of options.
Alarmgrid

Another company that offer an antenna and adapter cable.
Arcantenna
 
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Old 10-29-20, 05:55 AM
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Don't skimp on the coax cable used to connect to the antenna. At cellular frequencies there can be a lot of signal loss in the cable. So, use good cable and keep it as short as possible.

I use directional Yagi antennas at my house. The antenna must be aimed directly at a cell tower but it's high gain will provide a much stronger signal.

 
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Old 10-30-20, 10:19 AM
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I have occasionally had issues installing cellular communicators in my area.

I've seen the directional yagi antennas but looking at the connections and cables it seem that matching the connectors can be a daunting task trying to determine various male to female threads along with male to female pins. And also it seems there is some indication that the cable has to be matched to the antenna and device depending upon the length of the cable.

Does anyone have any detail on those issues?
 
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Old 10-30-20, 11:44 AM
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Yes, it can be more complicated than hooking an old TV up to a cable box. Because of the frequencies I think most antennas use 50ohm low loss coax cable. I assume that's why they use different connectors to prevent people from using plain olde 75ohm cable.
 
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Old 11-03-20, 01:47 PM
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I prefer not to use a directional yagi because I rely on two cell towers around five miles away that are 180 degrees apart. An omnidirectional would be better for me. I ordered the male u.fl to female sma bulkhead connector cable. The sma will mount on the lte-xa communicator. I have seen a few vertical antennas for around $20. Looks like they have around 5 db of gain. Has anyone had luck with a specific type of antenna? It would be nice to have a bit more info on something that has some sort of track record.
 
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Old 11-03-20, 02:38 PM
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I installed several before I retired. Always used manufacturers recommended antenna and waveguide; essential if you need tech support. If you install it outside, don't forget to form a rain drip with the waveguide just before entering the structure. Even if you install it in an attic, seal the connection between the waveguide and antenna as if it were outside. Moisture anywhere along the transmission path is your enemy. And height is your friend.
 
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Old 11-09-20, 02:29 PM
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I added a $15 omni vertical 5dbi gain antenna. Signal strength went to highest level reported by the central station. There are four levels, the lowest termed as unacceptable. I bought a jumper cable, u.fl to sma connector for inside the LTE-XA. To remove the u.fl connector I made an extraction tool. It worked perfectly. Much better than trying to remove it with your fingers. I made it from a Home Depot paint can opener. First, I squared up the lip of the tool to make it 90 degrees, then I used a dremel tool to cut the notch. Then some hand filing under a magnifying glass. If anyone wants a picture and dimensions, please PM or e-mail me.
 
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Old 11-09-20, 04:25 PM
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Good job. Thanks for letting us know how you made out.
 
 

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