Question about splicing vs long extension cord

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Old 01-18-21, 03:21 PM
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Question about splicing vs long extension cord

Hey Guys,

I want to install one of those flood lights with a camera right above my garage door. In the package, it gave me a very short extension cord with open wiring. So hypothetically, once I drill my hole above the garage door, if I have a nearby outlet, then my work is pretty much done? All I do is splice the white with white, black with black, and the green with the yellow? Then plug it in?

What if I don't have a nearby outlet? Is there any rule of thumb against long extension cords? Is it better to tap into and splice existing cables versus pulling a very long extension cord? I do see see some outlet boxes nailed against exposed 2x4's in my garage. Is it better to splice one of these cables versus simply getting a longer extension cord? Thanks!



 
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Old 01-18-21, 03:36 PM
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For a permanent lighting installation, it's far better, safer, and more to code to run wire back to a proper source. in the home wiring. If your outlet is relatively close, getting a longer weather rated appliance cord is far better than trying to splice the short cord.
 
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Old 01-18-21, 03:58 PM
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Typically that light would be mounted to a an electrical box and the splicing would be contained within.
 
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Old 01-18-21, 05:42 PM
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But if we were to use the extension cord, is my understanding correct in that the green wire from the cord goes with the yellow wire from the unit?
 
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Old 01-18-21, 06:14 PM
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No..... I would not assume that.
The case of the light is ground and no additional ground may have been supplied.
Black should be hot, white should be neutral and yellow may be switched out to other lights.

It should be clarified in the installation instructions.
 
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Old 01-18-21, 08:52 PM
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So I carefully looked at the manual and they do instruct that the GREEN go with the YELLOW. They actually first ask us to do all these connections with the 3 wire nuts, and power it on to set up the network. Then once it's done, I guess undo it and move it to a junction box. At the junction box, the green and yellow will twist together still, but instead of a wire nut, they will wrap around a ground screw on the junction box bracket. So, this extension cord is the easier method for me to understand, since that's the only thing that's illustrated for me. I just need to get a longer extension cord.

But for my education... how would splicing into a source work? Along my exposed beams are some outlet boxes. I have garage lights connected to these boxes. And they all respond to a main switch at the door entering the home. If I were to splice into one of these lines, that means my lights would be on all night, right? That's not good.

I do have another switch at the side garage door. This flip controls an external light bulb for the side walk-way. This is the line I should find to tap into, right? Get a long enough cable, splice it, put everything in a junction box, and pull cable all way to the location of the floodlights, which will be above garage door, then splice it there. Is my thinking correct?
 
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Old 01-19-21, 05:10 PM
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If you aren't familiar with how to tie in a new device into an existing switched circuit; I would highly recommend that you have an electrician do your rough in. It's very easy to do it incorrectly, and give your self a bunch of problems/hazards.
 
 

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