Firex Hardwired Smoke Alarm - Firex I4618


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Old 10-05-22, 07:41 PM
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Firex Hardwired Smoke Alarm - Firex I4618

I purchased 8 of these smoke detectors to replace the smoke detectors installed by the builder in 2000. I bought them in 2009, and yes, I believe I win the procrastination award!! These are still in the original box & plastic, do these have a set life (Ive heard 10 years and they stop working). Can I install today (more likely over the next several months) and expect 10 years out of them? Or since they are technically 13 years old are they outdated?
 
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Old 10-06-22, 01:05 AM
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Ten year replacement is a recommendation. It is not written in stone and smoke detectors will not stop working if older. They just loose sensitivity with age. CO detectors have a limited life by manufacturer.

No.... there is no expiration of NOS (new old stock) smoke detectors.
So technically that means you could use them.

Personal opinion.... technology has changed a lot in 13 years.
I would highly recommend replacing them with newer models.
They're not that expensive and you'll be getting the best protection available.
 
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Old 10-06-22, 04:39 AM
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I think the original 10-years in NFPA 72 The National Fire Alarm Code, was a recommendation, but the 10-years is now a code requirement. Requirements are indicated by "shall".

Electronic components can degrade with time, even if unpowered. And some can degrade dramatically.

This isn't the Groucho Marx/Jay Leno TV show. I wouldn't bet my life on old life safety devices.
 

Last edited by ThisOldMan; 10-06-22 at 07:20 AM.
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Old 10-06-22, 10:32 AM
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I agree.

My reply was based on not finding any mention in the code on new un-used smoke detectors.
If they are in use the requirement is 10 year replacement.
 
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Old 10-06-22, 12:52 PM
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Now that I think of it, it was my CO detector that came up with a message and stopped functioning, and I needed to replace it after 10 years.

so, my old unused smoke detectors will work, would be within code, but not the smartest thing to do. Well, the cost of buying new smoke detectors is way less than the cost (or potential cost) of taking a risk on outdated technology.

Thanks for the advice!
 
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Old 10-06-22, 04:38 PM
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Just adding my 2 cents regarding smoke detectors. Firex brand is the brand I have in my house and I am lucky if I get 8 yrs. out of them. When one goes I replace all them in the house as I figure the rest will go soon. All smoke detectors show a manufacturer date and I believe all say replace 10ys. from date of manufacturer, at least firex do and firex only warranty 5yrs from that date. I would not trust the old ones even though they have never been used. It was said that tech has come a long way in those yrs. and I agree. As you know Home Depot sells them but at least around here you really have to pick through the units to find the newest stock.
 
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Old 10-06-22, 08:04 PM
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CO detectors are programmed to start beeping or shut down at a certain age.
Most are 8 years. I think I've seen some newer ones that say 10 years.
 
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Old 10-07-22, 06:50 PM
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It's a chemistry thing. The reactive element in carbon monoxide detectors has a finite life span. In the earliest models, it was as little as 5-6 years. Newer ones are formulated last around 10 years. The better models do a continuous check of this mechanism, and may last longer than their label dates, in the real world.

Basically the more CO they actually encounter, the shorter the lifespan. Someone, for example, that burned candles on a regular basis in a home with gas burning appliances, might find their CO detectors failing earlier than some.
 
 

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