Fire alarm in garage?


  #1  
Old 04-16-24, 12:07 PM
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Fire alarm in garage?

I have several tools which use lithium ion batteries. I charge the batteries in my attached garage. I am aware that Li batteries are more likely to combust than other types and am contemplating an alarm for the garage.

Obviously, a carbon monoxide detector shouldn't go in a garage where I have 2 gas cars and a gas water heater.

So the choice is between a smoke detector or a heat detector. Browsing the web, it seems that heat detectors are recommended more often for garages. I'm looking at something like this.

What do you guys think?
 

Last edited by RocketJSquirrel; 04-16-24 at 12:21 PM.
  #2  
Old 04-16-24, 12:40 PM
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Yes, that is a horrible environment for either a smoke or CO detector. A heat detector wall mounted above your charging area would be a good idea. A rate-of-rise model is the best choice.
 
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Old 04-16-24, 12:48 PM
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AT that price point it's probably not a waste as an alarm to warn people in the house but wouldn't a regular smoke detector do the same thing?

My garage burned to the ground 4 years ago. The time from when I smelled smoke to when the garage was fully involved was probably no more that 3-4 minutes. Lots depends on what you have stored in the garage. I had lots of gasoline, machines with gas tanks, spray paint cans etc. Plus a car with a tankful of gas.

If it were me I would limit the flammables and charge the LI batteries in an area where there was nothing to burn except the battery. I
 
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Old 04-16-24, 02:47 PM
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Charge your batteries in a fireproof area or container. Simply set your charger on the concrete floor a few feet away from anything and with nothing above. If you want a bench top charging area put down a piece of sheetrock. If you want to step up protection get a stainless steel pot or steel box (large ammo can) and set it on the sheetrock. Then put your charger in the pot. Then make sure there is nothing within several feet above the pot or immediately nearby.

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I fly RC airplanes and their lithium batteries are the most dangerous by far. I made a charging station in the house out of Hardi Backer. I made a box with a hinged lid. I used steel angle for the corners and held everything together with small nuts & bolts and a piece of piano hinge for the lid. The bottom, also Hardie, has four steel nuts glued to the bottom to space it off the surface it's sitting on. A piece of sheetrock underneath further increases the protection.

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Hardie Backer and sheetrock are both fireproof. By taking advantage of each material's properties you can make a highly fire resistant charging area. Rely on Hardie where you need durability and strength. Then put sheetrock where you want increased protection from intense heat.

Hardie is durable and has reasonable structural strength. It will not burn but over time the heat of the fire will eventually seep through the Hardie and may ignite things on the other side.

Sheetrock, in a fire the intense heat breaks down the chemical bonds in the gypsum releasing water vapor which carries heat away. This cooling affect helps prevent the heat of the flame from making it's way through the sheetrock so it's good for protecting other things nearby. Unfortunately sheetrock is even less strong during/after a fire so you don't want it to fall during a fire.

 
  #5  
Old 04-17-24, 05:54 AM
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I have rate-of-rise heat detectors in my garage.

But as an added safety measure, all of my battery chargers are on a manually-set timer.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
It can be set for 1, 2, 4 or 8 hours. Most of my chargers/batteries will complete a full charge in two hours, so when I am in the garage I set it for two hours. I've had this setup for a couple of years now and it works for me.

I know it isn't foolproof but I have a greater peace of mind, as the only time that the batteries are charging is when I am in the garage, or at least close by and awake.
 
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Old 04-21-24, 01:00 PM
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Well, it appears I bought half a product.

I bought this unit from Amazon. It came with no instructions and no indication of where to install a battery.

Below is the unhelpful label on the inside of the unit. It appears I need a base for this but there's no indication where or how to get the base.

Any ideas?



 
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Old 04-21-24, 01:48 PM
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Amazon's AI told me

The base for the HOCHIKI DCD-135 heat detector is sold separately, as the detector itself does not include a mounting base. To purchase the compatible base, you would need to look for a model such as the Hochiki DCD-B Base or similar. The base allows the detector to be mounted and provides access to insert the batteries.
Too bad this info wasn't presented on the main detector page.
 
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Old 04-21-24, 01:56 PM
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Here's the data sheet with the right part numbers. It sounds like you want the base that will allow 2-wire operation. https://www.hochikiamerica.com/img/p...%2006-2023.pdf

Depending on the price, you might want to go with the system sensor 5601P. Those come with the base and are usually under $20 from most vendors.

What alarm system are you planning to connect this thing to? Heats like this aren't standalone devices. Kidde does make a heat that works like a smoke alarm with a built in sounder, both in battery operated and 120v powered.
 
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Old 04-21-24, 04:48 PM
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Note the End-of-Line Supervision device; not found on single/multiple station detectors. Also the input voltage range of 15 to 33 VDC; no 120 VAC. That is a system heat detector for use with a fire alarm panel.

Search for single station residential heat detector. The heat detector has to be interconnected with the smoke alarms in the house, which generally means same brand (check copatibility listings!).

I believe heat detectors with a minimum 50' spacing are still required for residential. In the past that ment the detector had to include rate-of-rise detection. Caveat emptor.
 
 

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