Resume requested w/salary request


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Old 01-13-06, 04:27 PM
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Resume requested w/salary request

My sister just graduated from college and is looking for a job. She has her resume done and told me a company requested her resume by email as well as how much she wants to get paid. As I am not experienced with this I wasn't sure. She is working part time in for the meanwhile in her degree @ $12/hr. Basically I told her to ask for more than that and what does she want? Also, to check out salary.com as you can get an average amount or so on what people make. I don't know if that site is accurate or not but we use it for work. Anyway, how does one come up with such a figure?

BTW: it's kinda fun going to that site b/c I went on there, typed out my job position and I make twice as much as average so I hope I never get fired!!!
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 01-13-06 at 04:28 PM. Reason: incorrect spelling
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Old 01-16-06, 05:16 AM
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This is a tough issue. I tend to throw resumes if the person is seeking considerably more than I am planning to pay. I don't lower the pay if a person lists something lower, but I would bet that a lot of employers would. The best answer is, of course, to answer whatever the employer was expecting to pay and I think your suggestion of the website to try and figure that out was a good place to start.
 
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Old 01-17-06, 02:21 PM
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I thot about the same thing you said. She was kinda low and I guess that's why they called her right away...kinda sad but you have to start somewhere I guess!
 
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Old 03-03-06, 01:52 PM
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I would think her advisors at college could give her some kind of an idea of what she could expect. They probably have a good handle on what one could make as a starting salary. She can also look at jobs on those online places that advertise to get an idea there too.
 
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Old 03-03-06, 04:15 PM
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Salary information

I guess I'm contrary to everyone else here--- but I would never put a salary range desired on my resume. That's an easy one to leave vague...

Salary desired: Commensurate with position and depending on total benefit package as well as future opportunity.
 
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Old 03-04-06, 05:42 AM
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I would never put salary information on an application without being asked. However, being deliberately evasive like zster recommended would get your resume trashed if I had asked you for specific information. There's no hard and fast rule because every employer is different, but failing to properly answer a question is one of the more sure ways to ruin your chances of being hired.
 
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Old 03-04-06, 06:11 AM
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Unless I already knew what an employer paid for the position, I have always inserted "Open" in the salary requested slot. When called for an interview, I then discussed the requirements of the job and what I needed for that position.
 
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Old 03-04-06, 06:54 AM
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I like majakdragon's response - it's a tough question to answer and this is a reasonable way to avoid committing yourself to a number that might hurt your chances of being hired or making what you're worth.
 
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Old 03-05-06, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by mitch17
I would never put salary information on an application without being asked. However, being deliberately evasive like zster recommended would get your resume trashed if I had asked you for specific information. There's no hard and fast rule because every employer is different, but failing to properly answer a question is one of the more sure ways to ruin your chances of being hired.
Don't let the sign off on my moniker fool you... it's intended to be humerous. I have been involved in hiring for a fortune 250 company for 20+ years - and leaving the "salary desired" vague is not "abnormal". I must agree with MajicDragon though on "open" being the best answer to the question. I also agree with Mitch17, that there are no hard and fast rules for employers. Most depends on the first individual screening resume's for interest.
 
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Old 07-10-06, 05:37 PM
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I really dislike that question

Hopefully I never have to answer it again, but it is a really bad question and it is a setup. Of the jobs I have interviewed for where the question was required, I have never received an offer over the "asking price". Granted, I have (to my knowledge) never been denied an interview because I asked for too much either (but I did lose out because I answered $100/hr for the "salary desired" question, I got the interview, but when asked to explain my answer, I pointed out that the question did not ask expected salary, it asked for the desired salary... needless to say, I did not get the job, but it was worth the expression on the interviewer's face).

It is particularily bad in cases where relocation is considered. My brother learned this the hard way. He was making a reasonable salary in a city where the cost of living was not too high. He was offered a different position with a 20% salary increase, however, he did not know that the cost of living was about 30% higher (it was his own fault, he should have done research). Needless to say, he is struggling with the big pay increase.

My question to employers would be, you already know what you are willing to pay, what is the point in asking the question?
 
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Old 07-10-06, 06:08 PM
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Originally Posted by DavePearson
My question to employers would be, you already know what you are willing to pay, what is the point in asking the question?
I ask the question only because it's on the store-bought application I use. Were I to make my own, I would not ask.
 
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Old 07-17-06, 01:11 AM
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I retired after having fifteen successful years in the placement and search fields. I have always told my candidates not to answer this if at all possible. The best response is that I am looking for opportunity and while compensation is important, it is too soon to discuss this. The same reply would be given for desired compensation. Stress the opportunity and mutual beneits of your being employed. Employers usually have a range they are willing to pay, but this is negotiable depending on the candidate's qualifications. I have seen employers go well above the range for the candidate they have chosen despite what the comp was.
 
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Old 07-23-06, 04:24 PM
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#1 rule concerning salaries.

The first person to give a dollar amount loses.

When asked, if e-mail say "open" on the resume, when asked in person say "what is the salary range for this position". Salary ranges are usually divided into quartiles, of 4 segments.

Ask for a salary in the third quartile or above the middle level.

The person hiring or HR is going to counter offer with something lower so try for the high end of the third quartile without statting a dollar amount. Its all a game and the company wants you as cheap as possible.
 
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Old 07-23-06, 08:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Dan Thompson
#1 rule concerning salaries.

The first person to give a dollar amount loses.

When asked, if e-mail say "open" on the resume, when asked in person say "what is the salary range for this position". Salary ranges are usually divided into quartiles, of 4 segments.

Ask for a salary in the third quartile or above the middle level.

The person hiring or HR is going to counter offer with something lower so try for the high end of the third quartile without statting a dollar amount. Its all a game and the company wants you as cheap as possible.
I think the advice in this post is excellent.
 
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Old 07-28-06, 07:38 AM
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You can't just put a salary on a resume unless this is a crummy job low paying job like flipping burgers. Every company offers different levels of benefits such as dental, medical, eye etc. stock options etc etc etc. You have to find out these before you can discuss salary. You may get a high paying job with no benefits, but after you pay for health insurance and other things that people who make a little less get your no are longer actually being paid more than others on the average. You could even be making less after paying for the same health coverage they are getting.

where I work some people are contracted to work here. One of the contractors just got hired and he was mainly concerned with the health insurance because its crazy here. It is so ridicously cheap for toplevel coverage you can't pass it up. After ge got hired he was like man I am going to get this surgery, get my prescriptions upped etc. etc. Because the coverage here is unheard of for the price we get it.
 
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Old 07-28-06, 08:05 AM
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Obviously putting a salary desired on a resume would be bad, the question was how to answer when asked on an application or during an interview. You raise a good point, health insurance has gotten so expensive that it can be more important to a person than the salary.
 
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Old 08-05-06, 11:43 PM
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The utility company I retired from played some salary games that bit them in the backside....
They hired some engineers at low pay, then about a year later they all threatened to quit when they found out that they were making less than union meter readers. They got their big pay adjustment, then several of them quit anyway. One I keep in contact with is now making double what he would be making if he had stayed. If you have the skills, shop around.
I would try to find out from current employees, if you know any, what the average might be for the position before even applying. Those companies that post a salary range right up front are the ones to interview with first. That should give you an idea of what the others have to compete with.
 
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Old 02-03-07, 11:05 AM
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Talking Union Meter Readers?

I was one of those meter readers, probably at a different utility company than UtahBill. The union shop steward was always "in my face" for doing my job too well (reading meters that other readers were "unable to read").

I soon found another job. I never joined a union.
 
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Old 02-03-07, 11:29 AM
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Well hopefully DIYaddicts sis got a job (and hopefully at a salary she is comfortable with) by now since the original thread was started over 1 year ago.


DIYaddict: did she? and how did she end up addressing the salary issue?
 
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Old 02-04-07, 08:13 PM
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Oh man...this is an old thread.

Yeah...she got the job. She just went around the salary issue. Instead of saying what she wanted to get paid...she went around that. She just stated what she currently made. She got the job and a year later-a couple weeks ago, she just got another job. Whew! They basically offer the same pay, which I guess that's normal.
 
 

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