Elec vs Gas comparison

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  #1  
Old 10-26-04, 11:10 AM
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Elec vs Gas comparison

looking to do some cost savings on my PG & E bill. I currenty have 2 major appliances that I am considering in converting to gas.

Appliances are an Elec. Jenn Air down draft cook top range package and an Elec. Whirlpool Dryer.

Option 1 is to convert both appliance to gas:
New Jenn Air cook top 50,000 btus (range will be elec)
New Sears Kenmoore Dryer 22,000 btus

if Option 1 is not feasible - looking for suggestions on what appliance (cook top vs dryer) will provide more of a savings.
 

Last edited by onetime; 10-26-04 at 11:18 AM. Reason: original incomplete
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  #2  
Old 10-26-04, 12:07 PM
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Costs are going up on all energy sources. Would say you have to decide which appliance you use more or longer at a time. Gas dryers are more expensive than electric initially but save overall. Didn't notice where you live but my electric goes out during storms. So I prefer gas for cooking. Choice is ultimately yours depending on how much you want to spend. Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 10-26-04, 05:04 PM
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Hello: onetime

Cannot cost effectively convert electric dryer to gas. Not parts or kits to revamp electric dryer to gas. Nor convert electric range to gas. Option one will not work and cannot be done. Would have to buy new appliances.

Not likely to notice much of any energy savings either. Neither appliances use all the much to make it cost effective to either attempt to convert appliances nor replace either. Costs to bring gas lines to those locations, if not already there, would immediately defeat any energy savings over the entire service life of the appliances.

PG&E supplies both energy sources. Compare the costs by those on the billing statement. Than compare the energy expected costs savings based on the energy lables of the appliances. Not much energy savings is there. Thus, not much money savings either.

Question was moved here, from the plumbing forum topic. Question does not relate to topics or questions in the plumbing forum topic.
 
  #4  
Old 10-26-04, 07:03 PM
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First you have to know the numerical factors as far as billing.

Kilo equals 1,000 for electric. example 1 kilo/watt/hr. costs 12.95 cents. Substitute actual cost found on bill.

Therm means 100,000 for gas. example 1 Therm costs 60.6 cents. Substitute actual cost found on bill.

The equation to determine costs is;

Wattage/BTU rating of appliance (times) Hours usage (times) Rate of cost per kilowatt/therm (divided) 1,000 for electric or 100,000 for gas.

So using these figures I can give you an example that compare annual cost difference between the two.

Electric Dryer;

5,000 watts times 180 hours times 12.95 cents equals 116,550 divided by 1,000 equals $116.55 annual cost per year.

(5000 x 180 x .1295)/1000 = $116.55 annual cost per year.

Gas Dryer ; (22,000 x 180 x .606)/100000 = $24.00 annual cost per year.

Gas Range;

30,000 BTU/hr. times 365 hours times 60.6 cents equal 6,635,700 divided by 100,000 equals $66.36 annual cost per year.

(30000 x 365 x .606)/100000 = $66.36 annual cost per year.

Electric Range ; (12,000 x 83.3 x .1295)/1,000 = $129.45 annual cost per year.

You can substitute the actual ratings of the appliances, hourly usage and cost per unit (kilowatt/hr and Therm) in the above equations to get a better idea on the savings. But based on the above; Gas verses Electric;

For a Dryer ; $116.55 - $24. = $92.55 or almost a 80% annual savings.

For a Range ; $129.45 - $66.36 = $63.09 or more than a 50% annual savings.

Average life expectancies of appliances;

Electric Dryer : 13 years

Gas Dryer : 14 years

Electric Range : 15 years

Gas Range : 18 years
 
  #5  
Old 10-27-04, 04:23 PM
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resercon

excellent post
 
  #6  
Old 10-28-04, 08:18 AM
julie53
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I bought all new appliances this year. One thing I determined; how long my clothes dryer ran was dependent on how well my washing machine worked. If the washer spins the water out of the clothing well I use the dryer less.


Julie
 
  #7  
Old 10-28-04, 08:26 AM
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Go to http://www.warmair.net

This will let you compare fuels there

ED
 
  #8  
Old 10-28-04, 09:34 PM
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Resercon

Absolutely great post. Data trumps opinions every time!

Keep up the good work.
 
  #9  
Old 11-02-04, 08:25 PM
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Not Correct

Unfortunately some of the 'cost comparisons' used to 'prove' that gas is cheaper than electric are based on faulty Therm and KiloWattHour comparisons...(In my region a KWH is only .05 cents)....

And the comparison does not take into account that an electric water heater is about 50% more efficient than any gas or LP water heater since 100% of energy from an electric water heater gets applied to heating the water while nealry half of gas heat goes up the chimney and never even touches the water and is completely wasted.

In MY region and for nearly 5 years running now, electric has become the energy of choice for heating and appliances and neither natural gas, oil, nor liquid propane can come close in cleanliness nor efficiency.

Make sure you are comparing apples to apples because some here have presented you with plums and cumquats and told you they were avocados....and never did get to the real energy issues...
 
  #10  
Old 11-03-04, 09:39 AM
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Just dumb info
In the late 60's we pulled electric heat out and went to oil or LP in all of the homes. Start of the 70's oil out and some electric furnace and LP. late 70's some Heat pumps and LP. By start of the 80's most heat pumps some LP. late 80's and to now just about all heat pumps.
That is in Mo. with UE at .05 KWh

ED
 
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