are honeycomb/cellular shades really engery efficient?

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  #1  
Old 03-17-05, 07:19 PM
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are honeycomb/cellular shades really engery efficient?

I need to buy some window coverings, and became interested in cellulars when I learned they claimed to be enegery efficient. I have double-pane windows, but they lose a signifcant amout of heat.

The interior window glass can become very cold, forming a convection cycle. If cellulars were installed, wouldn't the cooler air eventually just move around them as it would a standard window shade? Do the cellulars need to be touching the window glass to be effective?
 
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Old 03-18-05, 10:18 AM
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When it comes to saving energy and increasing comfort it is usually a combination of factors that influences the outcome. Rarely, if ever, will a single product or application accomplish what we desire.

Shades, regardless of the type, do provide some benefit. Keep in mind that convective air loops are influenced by different temperatures in the home. Meaning to say that it is the difference in temperature between the air in the home and the temperature at your windows that determine if you sense the convective air loop. The greater the temperature difference the more likely you will sense the convective air loop. So for the honeycomb shade to do what you want, it would have to reduce the temperature difference between the air in the home and windows.

The only way to reduce the temperature difference would be to reduce the amount of heat loss at your windows. Heat Loss is reduced through resistance and measured in R-Values. The honeycomb shades do not have that significant R-Value, compared to any other type of shade, to significantly reduce the temperature difference between the air in the home and you windows. In other words, regardless of the type of shade, the R-Value would not be that different.

I would recommend that your choice on the type of window shades be more influenced by your own personal preference than by what manufacturer's claim what their product can do.
 
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Old 03-19-05, 10:40 AM
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resercon - Thanks for the reply.

Take a look at these published R-Values:

http://www.blindcrafter.com/energyef...duct_chart.cfm

This site is sponsored or owned by Comfortex. The R-values are anything but insignifcant. In fact they're higher than the r-value of your average window.

I'm just wondering how effective these shades would be if used in conjunction with a low r-value window.
 
  #4  
Old 03-19-05, 02:33 PM
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To say that this is an exaggeration is an understatment. I can assure you they did not use standard conditions for their findinds. Meaning to say they probably used the temperature of the interior of the average window and the inside of the house. Whereas in standard testing the temperature outside is 32 degrees Fahrenheit and inside the home is 70 degrees Fahrenheit. On that alone I would not use or recommend this product to anyone.
 
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