Problem with weather stripping a warped door


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Old 08-16-09, 05:16 AM
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Problem with weather stripping a warped door

The door that goes from kitchen to the garage is probably the most used door in the house and I can't find a way to properly seal it because the gaps are larger in some places than in others which makes me think the door is probably warped. I've put weather stripping around but no matter what size I use, it's too tight in some places and the door won't close without pulling hard. Short of installing a new door, which I can't afford (layoff! ), is there something else I could use or another way of doing it? I'd thought about putting the weather stripping directly on the door frame, or else on the door itself. Is that a dumb idea?
 
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Old 08-16-09, 06:38 AM
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If you're not putting it on the door or the frame where are you putting it?

If you can make it work,which would be situation specific,there is a type of weatherstrip commonly known as "jam up" but that's not what it will be called on the package etc.It is a kit of three sections,two for the sides of a door one for the top,that are rigid,either plastic or metal,with a flexible bead running along one side of the sections.It is mounted on the frame so that the door closes up against the soft bead and seals.The plastic type is somewhat flexible and might conform to a warped door.It is attached to the frame by small nails or screws.

This will only work if there is room on the frame for it.

go to a real hardware store where there are sales people with knowledge,describe your situation in detail and let them help you with a solution.There are many types of weatherstripping available and many have particular requirements to make them work properly or at all.
 
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Old 08-17-09, 10:58 AM
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I was afraid my explanation would cause confusion but I didn't know how else to put it! Let me give it another shot --- I am putting it on the part of the door frame in a little corner next to the latch plate with the widest part of the stripping parallel to the door. With the door closed, the stripping is crushed between the frame and the door and the only visible part of the stripping is the edge.

Where I'd thought about putting it is on the wide part of the frame with the widest part of the stripping perpendicular to the door so when the door closes it would just meet the stripping. The entire strip woud be visible with the door either opened or closed.

Does this make more sense or have I confused you further?

...that said, I suppose my best bet is to do as you suggested and go to a hardware store, but I thought I'd ask about the stripping thing anyway.
 
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Old 08-17-09, 11:45 AM
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I'm guessing you're using stick on foam tape.There are better products than that as the foam rarely survives a full season.

Yes go to a hardware store,try to find a full possibly older one that's been around and has people working there that have solid knowledge.

There's a huge variety of weatherstripping out there.
 
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Old 08-17-09, 03:41 PM
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Smile

You guessed right. And this is the second round of it I've tried to use. Pretty much worthless stuff!

I'll take your advice and go to a hardware store, but I don't know of any old hardware stores around here. Most of them have gone out of business - can't compete in this economy I guess. Ace Hardware is the only one I know of. Maybe I can find an old survivor in the yellow pages.

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 08-17-09, 05:27 PM
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Weather-stripping won't work if door not square.

In most cases, the door is out of plumb. Open the door until it is at least perpendicular to the opening. Take a popsicle stick or something similar and tack or tape it to the very top corner of the door having the stick extend outward at least 2 inches on the latch side of the door. Tie a string the length of the door to the end of the stick and a small weight to the end of the string. Once the string stops moving, it is straight up and down, or plumb if you prefer.

To determine if the door is plumb, you measure the distance from the top of the door to the string. Then measure at several other places. If the measurement at the other places are equal to the measurement that you got at the top of the door, then the door is plumb. If not, this one is fairly easy.

To plumb the door once you know the measurement with the plumb bob is to take a door stop or similar type wedge and slide it under the knob side of the door with the door open at least half way. With the plumb bob still in place slide the wedge in or out from under the door till the measurements between the string of the plumb bob and door are equal at several points. What this means is if the string is straight up and down, then so is the door.

Then get some tooth picks and wood carpenter's glue. Remove one screw from a hinge. Dip two tooth picks in the wood carpenter's glue and insert it into the screw hole. Trim off the ends of the tooth picks so it does not protrude outside the hinge. Then re-insert the screw. Repeat this process with all the screws on the hinges on both the door and the door jamb. It is also prudent to check for plumb by taking measurements between the string and door after each screw is done.

This sounds harder than it really is.
 
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Old 08-17-09, 07:04 PM
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Believe it or not, I understood that perfectly and it doesn't sound hard at all. I'll definately try this and see what happens. You may very well be right. Now that I look at it, maybe it's just not adjusted right!

As much as I appreciate your suggestion, it will just have to wait until tomorrow -- I'm so tired right now, that door just doesn't take priority over a hot shower and a big comfy bed!

Thanks again! I'll keep you posted!
 
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Old 08-23-09, 06:08 AM
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How funny - I have the same problem with both my front door and back door and I just sat down to type up an explanation, and it looks like you are having the same exact problem! My doors are both plumb, but it's an old house.

I have tried different sizes of foam on both doors, but can't get a proper fit, so in the winters I have a tremendous draft coming in. Let me know if you find a type of stripping that works. I think the only thing I need is a type that would mold to the exact shape of my doors, but still allow them to close.
 
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Old 08-23-09, 08:17 AM
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3M US: V-Seal Weather Strip

V-seal is probably the best for doors and there are quite a few manufacturers, the link above is just one. The V weather-stripping takes up the gap between the door and jamb regardless if the gap is irregular. FYI; as with all adhesives, the surface it is applied to must be clean for it to work well.
 
 

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