Ok to remove basement door?


  #1  
Old 01-06-10, 10:19 AM
M
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Ok to remove basement door?

I would like to permanently remove my basement door and was wondering if this is a bad idea. I'm primarily concerned about energy conservation and potential fire hazards. I believe the temperature differential shouldn't be a problem since I recently installed a three vents and a return in the basement, so it is pretty comfortable down there. Is there any reason why I should leave the door on?
 
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Old 01-06-10, 11:18 AM
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You need to replace the water heater or the furnace. What route do the workers and materials have to take to get to the basement?

A fire suddenly breaks out between you and the basement stairs. How do you save yourself?

If you need a new door, get one and have it properly installed. It will conserve both energy and possibly your - or a loved one's life.
 
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Old 01-06-10, 12:51 PM
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Sounds more like you want to leave the opening and simply not have a door. Is that correct? If so, you are just fine. Although many homes have doors between some levels, most dirst and second floor levels do not.

The drawback would be an increase in the stack effect, the rising warm air that leaks out on the upper levels and pulls in cold air to the lower levels. But just taking the door off the hinges for awhile would tell you if you are creating any big issues.

If you are eliminating access to the basement, the other concerns mentioned should be looked at.

Bud
 
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Old 01-06-10, 01:51 PM
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I just added a landing and door for the exact reason Bud is talking about. Before the door, in the summer the cool air falls to the basement making the main floor warmer. During the winter all the warm air goes up making the basement colder. With the door I can dam the air from going up or down.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 01-06-10 at 03:14 PM.
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Old 01-06-10, 02:51 PM
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I can't even begin to count how many times I've had to remind my wife to close the basement door to keep the temp in the whole house balanced
 
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Old 01-06-10, 06:56 PM
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My bad. I assumed (bad idea) that he was speaking of an exterior door into the basement.
 
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Old 01-07-10, 10:06 AM
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I am proposing that I remove the door to the interior door to the basement and leave an opening. Sounds like I should just leave it in place. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-08-10, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by mossman View Post
I am proposing that I remove the door to the interior door to the basement and leave an opening. Sounds like I should just leave it in place. Thanks.
When we got a cat, I started to leave the door to the basement open so she could use the litter box. I've noticed some impact on the temperature balance, but not too significant.
 
  #9  
Old 01-17-10, 07:15 PM
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I cut in a hole for the kitty door in the wall at the top of the basement steps. This way the basement door doesn't get messed up and the kitty doesn't have to make such a big step.
 
 

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