I want to add a through-wall range hood


  #1  
Old 02-19-13, 09:53 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MI
Posts: 2,634
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I want to add a through-wall range hood

My vacation cottage is waiting for spring when I will cover it with cedar siding. Now is the time I'm thinking about trim, light & outlet locations & bases, etc. I'm planning a vented microwave over the range and want to exhaust it outside. The wall in question is my north-facing wall and I'm on a lake so it's often windy. What's the best practice for installing without having problems later with air leakage or an ice-cold microwave? I've installed a couple of these in the past but with duct running up through kitchen soffit. On this job there's no soffit so straight out the back seems best. I can tell from the kit parts there's no thought given to keeping it from acting like a big hole in the wall.
 
  #2  
Old 02-19-13, 12:34 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 25,318
Received 914 Votes on 841 Posts
Most vent out the top so I suppose you are going to have to install a 90 degree and go out through the wall. Does the microwave have a damper? The last one I installed had a damper that was part of the adapter to go to the ducting (and almost lost among all the packaging).
 
  #3  
Old 02-19-13, 02:33 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MI
Posts: 2,634
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
When energy loss programs ask how many doorbells are on a house I assume it's because of the tiny air leak from drilling through the wall. Aren't there any special steps to an energy-wise install of a range hood besides cutting a big hole in the wall & fastening a sheetmetal collar to it? I just assumed things had advanced beyond that.
 
  #4  
Old 02-19-13, 03:39 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 25,318
Received 914 Votes on 841 Posts
And, there is nothing worse for energy efficiency than using power (running a vent fan) to pump out the precious heated air from the home and forcing cold air to get sucked in to replace it.
 
  #5  
Old 02-20-13, 07:44 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MI
Posts: 2,634
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
And yet that's right where we are with tight houses that require ventilation.


A range hood is not required for a 30" range but I've never lived in a house that didn't have one. I'm amazed how quickly normal cooking fills the air with vapor & smoke and I don't have even a bath fan to exhaust it.

I haven't read much about all the new insulation and sealing techniques but I don't remember seeing this big hole in the wall discussed before.
 
  #6  
Old 02-20-13, 08:04 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 25,318
Received 914 Votes on 841 Posts
My in-laws new house is so tight that the vent fan is almost useless unless you open a window. And if you've ever tried broiling or blackening something on the stove without a working vent hood you realize how important it can be. They just crack a window in the kitchen when using the vent. At least that way it's drawing in cold air and mostly only chilling that room. I honestly don't know what you do short of installing a air to air heat exchanger which takes up a bit of space in addition to the additional cost.

 

Last edited by Pilot Dane; 02-20-13 at 08:07 AM. Reason: clicked button before finished
  #7  
Old 02-20-13, 09:52 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
Hi PD,
Actually, the HRV's and ERV's as pictured don't really provide make-up air in any quantity. A tight house and a large range hood needs a direct supply of outside air. To moderate its uncomfortable effects, it should be run through a heater of sorts. New requirements point to mandatory make-up air for any fans over 400 cfm. But a tight home with any naturally vented combustion appliances would still be in trouble.

Bud
 
  #8  
Old 02-20-13, 12:35 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MI
Posts: 2,634
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Isn't it madness to pile on the layers of insulation, seal it up tight as a drum, then pump in outside air so you don't choke to death? I just don't understand why we go to the nth degree to seal up a home only to be forced to install a scuttle. Look at all the problems created by layers of insulation and vapor barriers...peeling paint, mold & mildew, wood rot, lingering off-gasses & new carcinogen threats, skyrocketing new allergy complaints, etc. A healthy home needs to breathe.

Sorry...got off the track a little...
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: