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How To Remove Defective Caulking


BiggLarr's Avatar
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10-11-13, 10:11 AM   #1  
How To Remove Defective Caulking

I installed new windows and used a neutral curing, silicone caulk around the exterior perimeter of the window trim. Unfortunately, I had a few very old (about 10 years) tubes of caulk that must have gotten mixed in with newer tubes. So, a few of the windows have caulking around them that will not cure. It's been over 24 hours with very nice, dry, 70 degree weather & the caulk still has the consistency of toothpaste. It's very workable & I've come to the conclusion that this will never cure properly. It is also EXTREMELY difficult to remove completely from my cedar siding. Does anybody have any tips for removing this stuff from a very grainy wood surface?

 
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10-11-13, 12:16 PM   #2  
Welcome to the forums!

About all you can do is scrape off the bad caulk and scrub off the residue with paint thinner.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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10-11-13, 12:21 PM   #3  
I run into problems with the tube going solid before use if they are old. I would give them some more time to set up. As far as removing from cedar, when it cures, it should pull off the cedar fairly easily. At least from my experience in the past. When I bought my house 13 yrs ago, the windows were not properly sealed around the perimeter. I asked that they seal as a condition of closing. Big mistake as they hired Joe have-not-a-clue to do the caulking and it was awful. I followed up by gently dragging a utility knife to a straight line and lifted the excess caulk off the cedar.

 
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10-12-13, 06:18 AM   #4  
I never would have used silicone in the first place.
#1 It's not paintable.
It's horrible to try and tool to make it look good.

 
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07-19-14, 07:54 AM   #5  
Plain Old Rubbing Alcohol Did The Trick

After three days, the silicone still had a very thin consistency, so I decided to remove it. I scraped away the largest portion, then used isopropyl alcohol (99%) and some shop rags to remove the rest. It was a lot of work, but the cedar was left very clean, with no oily or sticky residue. Thanks for all the tips!

 
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