Xeriscaping

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-18-07, 01:29 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,818
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Xeriscaping

What is xeriscaping? Landscaping with native drought tolerant species in order to reduce the need for water for the landscaping materials. These can also include plantings that are more pest resistant in order to reduce the need for chemicals.

Learn more: http://www.ciwmb.ca.gov/organics/Xeriscaping/

Anyone care to share xeriscaping tips?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-18-07, 01:47 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Xeriscaping Tips to Get You Started

I've been xeriscaping for close to 5 years in Pennsylvania - our zone was 8-9ish. My climate did provide rain, unlike semi-arid SoCal where we are now - but my interest in xeriscaping when I started was to have maintenance free micro climates throughout my yard, aka my flower beds!

I was successful in that the most densely planted zeriscaped beds required very, little maintenance, just only occasional weeding - no watering at all.

My tip to get you started is actually to take a drive. Head out on a road in your area and observe what grows along side the road. This will indicate what can withstand full sun, full winds - all the weather conditions present in your area - and what requires virtually no maintenance.

You may be surprised to learn that what's growing on the side of the road is actually a native flowering plant, not a weed! In my area, these included (in layman's terms) black eyed susans, lambs ears, daisies and day lilies.

Take your observations back home and hop online to source your plants. I can't say enough about <a href="http://www.highcountrygardens.com">High Country Gardens</a> as a xeriscaping resource. I've used them from the start and have been consistently impressed with the quality of their plants, not to mention their voracious research!
 
  #3  
Old 10-18-07, 02:29 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,818
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If the beauties can survive along the road during drought, chances are good they can survive in your landscape. Every season brings on new treats. Plant identification can be a fun hobby, and it's good exercise. Pick up some wildflower books. Study growth characteristics and determine if it's an invasive species. You likely will not want your landscape overrun by some of your wild finds.

The wildflowers have faded around my cabin, except for a few frazzled golden rods. Iron Weed, Queen Anne's Lace, Butterfly Weed, Wild Geraniums, Wild Ageratum, and other old friends have faded as they passed their prime. I am not disheartened because I am surrounded by many species of evergreen trees and plants. Then, spring will return in all its glory. Thus, if selecting from native species, choose plants that can be enjoyed every season.
 
  #4  
Old 10-18-07, 02:31 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
that's a good point about invasive species - high country gardens does make note of zones where different varieties may become invasive...
 
  #5  
Old 10-18-07, 04:28 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,818
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have yet to find the definitive wildflower book. Most states tend to have taken the Federal list of invasive species and added their own. See this link: http://www.wildflowerinformation.org...ildflowers.asp
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: