Organic Weed Prevention

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  #1  
Old 11-19-09, 01:49 AM
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Organic Weed Prevention

Hi!

I've heard that corn meal and corn gluten are both effective, organic pre-emergent weed control.

Are the the same thing, as the price for both is significantly different.

Thank you!

Quietman
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 11-19-09 at 04:19 AM. Reason: No external links please.
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  #2  
Old 11-25-09, 02:22 AM
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Oh, wait, is this a question? You're asking if what you heard is true?
 
  #3  
Old 11-25-09, 02:14 PM
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Look at the back of the bag, it will tell you what is in it.
 
  #4  
Old 11-26-09, 04:59 AM
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Yep, it's a question, sorry about the bad punctuation.

Agreed, read the bag. So two possible bag results:

1) Corn Gluten
2) Corn meal

Are they equally effective in pre-emergnet weed control??

Thank you!

Quietman
 
  #5  
Old 11-26-09, 07:10 AM
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I did some digging on the web to see if there was much of a difference between the two. I found this link that has the answers to several questions relating to corn meal and corn gluten. Ask The Expert: Corn meal

IT says that corn gluten meal is a pre-emergent herbicide and corn meal is a fungicide and will not kill seeds of any kind.
 
  #6  
Old 12-19-09, 02:30 PM
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I had heard about Horticulture Vinegar... i was going to look into it for next season.

I've got some teasel i need to deal with.

has anyone heard about this vinegar?
 
  #7  
Old 12-20-09, 09:15 PM
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Vinegar as an Herbicide The word vinegar comes from vinegre, coined from two Latin words vinum meaning wine and acer meaning sour. There are a number of historical references about the use of vinegar as a preservative, condiment, beauty aid, cleaning agent and medicine.

Vinegar can be produced naturally by decomposition of plant products under anaerobic conditions. Acetic acid, commonly called ethanoic acid, with a chemical formula CH3COOH, is formed by the fermentation of alcohol. Vinegar of about 5% acetic acid concentration is prepared from wine (grapes), cider (apples), or malt (grain). The biological process of vinegar manufacture involves conversion of sugars into alcohol and carbon-dioxide through fermentation. By an oxidative process, the alcohol in presence of certain bacteria reacts with air to form vinegar. Concentrated acetic acid as used in industry is prepared by several synthetic processes, such as the reaction of methyl alcohol and carbon monoxide (CO) in the presence of a catalyst, or the oxidation of acetaldehyde or petroleum. This synthetic process is not acceptable for agricultural use by the organic community. Acetic acid concentration of vinegar derived from plant sources can be increased from 5 % to 15% via distillation and to 30% via freeze evaporation or other processes. The organic community approves of these processes for agricultural use.

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Last edited by pmgca; 12-21-09 at 08:35 AM. Reason: Note of the Moderator
  #8  
Old 12-23-09, 03:01 PM
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thanks for adding the link... that site was very helpful.

I have a place locally that sells Vinegar 30% acidity. That should help with the teasal, and the pigweed that grows in my pavers.
 
  #9  
Old 12-23-09, 07:30 PM
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Hi tcs1366,

A good tip for the weed under under pavers: the pavers are usually set over a layer of sand, therefore you can easily remove some of them and spread coarse salt. With the rain, the salt will melt and cover all the surface eliminating the weed
And, nope, it will not appear again
 
  #10  
Old 12-26-09, 08:33 AM
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Vinegar is easy, cheap and organic

I've used vinegar straight out of the bottle - just plain old kitchen white vinegar. Go to bed with healthy weeds, wake up with dead ones. It works everytime.
A word of caution - it will kill any type of plant so only use it in areas (like between the cracks of pavers) where you don't want anything else to grow.
 
  #11  
Old 12-28-09, 06:33 AM
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thanks for the tip on the salt. I knew salt kills things... but never thought to use it on the patio.

funny thing... i was collecting seeds over the summer.... [linum perenne] and had all the little 'seed balls' in a plastic container ... a huge gust of wind came and blew the seeds all over the place.... Around Oct time frame... i had tiny little Flax popping up all over the patio. I was hoping they would come back in the spring, and i'd try to transplant them.... the seedlings should pull easily out of the sand, just like the pigweed does.

I always have gallons of household vinegar as i use it for cleaning. Will give that a try on the teasal, if the strength is not strong enough, i will have to get the horticulture one. But -- if it does kill them.. then WooHoo, found a super cheap weed killer.
 
  #12  
Old 01-04-10, 10:24 PM
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Normal household vinegar doesn't normally work - try and get the 20% variety (or make it yourself if you're that way inclined)
 
  #13  
Old 01-12-10, 04:13 PM
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If you use vinegar, I find it works best in the morning, so the sun can get to the plant after you spray it all day.
 
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