How to tell the CFM rating of a unit

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Old 05-25-16, 01:17 PM
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How to tell the CFM rating of a unit

Hello again,

I picked up a unit that has no labels or stickers indicating the specs. I do know it's a MasterCool down draft. It has a 1 hp., 2-spd. motor. It's 40" wide x 28" tall and the tray that the pads sit on is 12" wide. It did not come with pads.
Now, this unit looks and has the same dimensions as my CHC631 unit which is 6400 cfm. However, when shopping for pads I discovered that both the 4800 and 6400 cfm units have a 12" pad available as a replacement. I was under the impression that the 12" pads were for the 6400 cfm units.

My question is how can I determine the actual cfm rating for this unit? Is the fan smaller in one than the other? What is the determining factor in the cfm rating?

Thanks!

Steve
 
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Old 05-25-16, 03:39 PM
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You have a 6500 cfm unit. The way to always tell, is the blower opening. Blower openings on side draft and down draft coolers, have had an industry wide size standard for many many years.
Any blower opening on a cooler that is 19.75 square, is a 6500 cfm unit. 17.75 openings, are 4500 cfm.
Over the years, manufacturers have fudged on cfm ratings to where now they call a 4500 cfm cooler, a 5,000 cfm but I still go by my old school thinking.

Now, back to your Celdek pad. Both 4500 and 6500 cfm coolers came with either 8 or 12 inch media as an option. I think the 6500 cfm mastercool pad is 28 inches tall
 
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Old 05-25-16, 04:28 PM
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Thanks, sammy.
Just out of curiosity, how were you able to deduce the size of the blower opening from my post since I didn't include that dimension?
And thanks for the quick reply. your advice/guidance has been extremely helpful over the years.

Steve
 
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Old 05-25-16, 08:22 PM
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Well, there may be a slight problem here. I was going on the fact that you mentioned one horse motor but when I go to the Symphony cooler website, (they are building the old Adobe air mastercool now.) They show the 4500 cfm unit as being just about 28 inches tall.

Just out of curiosity, what are the dimensions of your blower opening? If it is indeed the smaller cabinet, that one horse motor is waaaay too big for that thing.
 
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Old 05-26-16, 09:10 AM
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It's 20"x20".
Given the apparent age of this unit, I'm thinking it was made by MasterCool and not Adobe - unless Adobe was making them 10+ years ago. I'm guessing the age of it to be at least that old solely by the number of coats of paint on it.
As much as I HATE reading stamped metal, this is one case where I would welcome it. It would be so easy to stamp the model number and date of production somewhere since the label is so easily compromised (in my experience, anyway) by paint, sun fading, age, etc.

I wish I knew the progression and manufacturing history of MasterCool so I could glean the pertinent info used to ID a given cabinet. I'm not in the HVAC biz by any means - I'm a detailer, but for some reason, a number of friends who have swamp coolers think I am.

On a completely unrelated note...
Back in the mid 80's when I first moved to the PHX area, I had a cooler installed piggy-backed to my heat pump. It was made by Tradewinds. They were very popular due to the fact that their cabinets were made out of plastic of some sort which, of course, meant no rust. I wonder why they never capitalized on the roller coaster ride that MasterCool took and shot to the top of the heap.

I found an older post of yours in which you were discussing the two stage cooler - or more specifically, the pre-cooler you had bought and installed. Did I read that post correctly... was the pre-cooler $2,000 by itself?! I have a difficult time wrapping my head around adding something that expensive to a cooler that costs $650.00.

Steve
 
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Old 05-27-16, 02:56 PM
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Ok. let me start at the top of the list.
You have a 6500 cfm cooler.
McGraw Edison was the original owner before Arvin and then Adobe air.

Arvin came out with the Mastercool in 1984 and I'm not sure when exactly Adobe air bought them out, I'm thinking very late 80's.

Trade winds coolers were ok but if they caught fire, they burned really quick! Tradewinds was bought out by Essick/Champion somewhere along the line and they just kinda quit producing them.

Funny enough, Tradewinds did have a single inlet plastic Mastercool type of cooler that they came out with somewhere around 96-97 but they didnt make them very long.

The last Mastercool precooler that I bought, was 1200 bucks. The contractor model Mastercool that I attached it to, was another 1100 on top of that. The price was high for the combo but they worked excellent. Not only did they lower the air temperature but they also lowered the indoor humidity. A standard cooler on a hot day will run somewhere in the 60% range indoor humidity.
The precooler attached, would run somewhere around 45% indoor humidity.
Almost felt like the air conditioning was on.

One of my favorite coolers that Essick built exclusively for years for Sears, was the Rotobelt cooler. It was a two sided cooler with motor driven rotating polyester pads.
The other neat thing about Rotobelt was, the pad panels and water trays were plastic. The unit was also convertible, side draft/down draft.
 
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