Which is better or more efficient


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Old 07-23-22, 12:14 PM
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Which is better or more efficient

If I want to reduce moisture in a small room (say about 125 sqft or volume wise, about 833 cuft) to a max of 35% to 37% relative humidity, would a small size dehumidifier (similar to this:Amazon.com - Pohl Schmitt Electric Dehumidifiers for Home, 2200 Cubic Feet (225 sq ft) Portable Compact 17 oz Capacity Mini Quiet Dehumidifier for Bedroom, Bathroom, RV, Laundry Room or Closet -)

Or use an evaporator (similar to this: Amazon.com: Pignr Portable Air Conditioner, Evaporative Air Cooler with 4 Speeds Gradient Color Light & 70°Oscillating Function, 2 Humidification Capacity 600ml, 2-6 H Timing, room, home, office, White : Home & Kitchen)

To me an evaporator (also called swamp cooler) is nothing more than an air conditioner without a chemical circulationg pump. But it must be able to deposit the moist vapor someplace to keep the humidity down.

The reason for the inquiry is that I'm storing 3D printing filament which is very hydroscopic. And yes I'm using vac bags and dessicants, but I'm also looking for room comfort and minimum noise level. House is central A/C but this is an upstairs room.
 
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Old 07-23-22, 12:25 PM
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Maybe my ignorance but I thought a dehumidifier was a quazi air conditioner, it has a coil and compressor to lower the coil temp so that moisture condenses and is removed.

I also assumed a swamp cooler used water to lower the temp via evaporation which did not really change the humidity.
 
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Old 07-23-22, 12:35 PM
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I also assumed a swamp cooler used water to lower the temp via evaporation which did not really change the humidity.
Depends on how the "vapor" is disposed of. There are direct and indirect units. Moist air flowing over your body may feel cooler, but the air is heavy with moisture. So the saying it's very hot out, but its a dry hot as some say of the South West has some meaning if you don't want high humidity. Right now here in Western New York and other Great Lake cities we are experiencing muggy conditions. Even when the temps have fallan below the 80-90 degree range.
 
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Old 07-23-22, 12:45 PM
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here in Western New York and other Great Lake cities we are experiencing muggy conditions
Your not alone, SE Michigan, was nice the 2 weeks I took off over the 4th, then temps and humidity shot up.

Was a PITA shingling the new shed, would have been double PITA this week.


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Old 07-23-22, 12:48 PM
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Nice size shed.
 
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Old 07-23-22, 04:57 PM
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You need a dehumidifier.
An evaporative cooler is only used where the humidity is very low.
An evaporative cooler blows water soaked air to increase the humidity level.

The dehumidifier you linked to is a Peltier unit. It is a solid state junction on a metal plate.
There is a cold side and and a hot side.
There may be two small fans.... one moves air over the cold plate and the other to cool the hot plate.
This will be very slow and quiet.

Big Clive explains
 
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Old 07-23-22, 05:57 PM
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That was my original thought, but others in the hobby of 3D printing seem to differ. I'm having a discussion with an individual who insists that I should get an evaporator and not a dehumidifier.
 
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Old 07-23-22, 06:00 PM
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Yes.... it would be good to have a unit blowing moisture into the air.

I
 
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Old 07-23-22, 07:43 PM
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No!
I want to reduce environmental moisture. Filament is hydroscopic and absorbs water. That's not good for 3D printers. In fact they have dryers for just that condition or you can use an oven to try and bring filament back ino uisability. But it's iffy at best. Low humidity is what is needed. We use vac bags and dessicant to help keep it dry. But I want to keep the whole room on the dry side. I'd rather have hot dry air than cool humid air. Kind of like the southwestern area of the nation. Of course I'm speaking of summer time.
Winter is just the opposite to try and keep my humidty at least at 40%.
 
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Old 07-24-22, 12:39 AM
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I was being facetious Norm....... you would not want a unit that discharged moisture.
That's why I previously said you need a dehumidifier.
 
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Old 07-24-22, 04:59 AM
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Went right over my head!
 
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Old 07-24-22, 05:01 AM
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Hmmmm, flippant comets, who would have thought!


 
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Old 07-24-22, 05:02 AM
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