Removal of sprayed on stucco

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  #1  
Old 03-13-04, 04:44 PM
RoadGurl
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Removal of sprayed on stucco

Hello!

Can anyone tell me how to remove:

Stucco that was sprayed on to exterior (exterior is cedar clapboard/siding) without any without any primer first and no sealant after. To its credit is has held up for about 25 years. Now, many chunks of stucco are simply falling off, easy to pick off etc. However, there are many sections that it simply will not come off. This stuff is about one sixteenth to one eight of an inch thick.

Any suggestions out there with many many thanks.
RoadGurl.
 
  #2  
Old 03-13-04, 05:49 PM
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A scraper may be the best tool now.
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-04, 05:54 PM
RoadGurl
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removal

thank you for your reply. I have tried a scraper, it's not coming off.
any other ideas?
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-04, 06:22 PM
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You may need a larger scraper. There is no solvent for stucco over wood so far as I know. Mortar products stick really well to many things and wood is one of them.

One thing that may help this along would be to wet the siding so that water can soak through the stucco and around the edges where it has been removed so far. Siding is not intended to be perpetually wet, so don't create a problem you don't already have.

Tough job. Good luck.
 
  #5  
Old 03-13-04, 08:24 PM
RoadGurl
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water

what do you think about pressure washing?
 
  #6  
Old 03-14-04, 07:15 PM
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Pressure washing won't allow the water to soak in the way just spraying it on the siding with a hose will. High pressure washers can cause damage to wood siding, unless used carefully. Trying to blast off the stucco from soft cedar siding might create a heartache.
 
  #7  
Old 03-14-04, 10:51 PM
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You might try rapping it with a hammer. It should crack and break off without hurting the wood too badly. Don't count on saving the siding, however. The stucco is probably pretty deep into the wood pores and isn't going to come off easily.
 
  #8  
Old 03-21-04, 07:29 AM
RoadGurl
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Unhappy roll on stucco?

OK, now I'm thinking I have to re-stucco.
Why? I can't get some of the patches off the cedar siding..well a fair bit.
It would be to costly to sandblast or to reside the entire house vs. re-spray on stucco?
Does anyone know for sure?

Or does anyone know of a 'roll-on' stucco I can use to roll the entire house?

ug.

Thanks for all you help folks you are wonderful
 
  #9  
Old 03-21-04, 08:36 AM
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Hello: RoadGurl

May I ask what is the objective here? If you want to remove the existing sprayed on stucco (most likely to be tex-cote) to restucco that's one objective.

If you want to remove the existing stucco to paint over the wood that's another objective. In either case all the existing stucco would have to be removed. Lots of work involved.

To stucco over palces where the existing stucco is not removed, two applications are required. First one to level the entire surface. Second coat to cover the entire surface.

In this manner no bumps would be seen between the areas where some existing stucco remained and some was removed. Same applies if painting over was to be done. Have to somehow fill in to level the surfaces to obtain a level finished surface.

Tex Cote has an undercoating applied to the wood first. It's serves as an adherent for the sprayed on stucco and a water proofing undercoating.

Where it was applied correctly, the stucco remains. Where it was not, the existing stucco peels off or flakes off. So to get the final results wanted, you decide what you want as the final results.

Sand blasting would leave marks and sand in the wood which would have to be sanded out and filled in to obtain a smooth final finish. Paint fills in nothing.

Sand blasting would work if restucco was to be done. A sealer would need to be applied to the wood first. The sealer would also have to have the adherent to bond with the stucco. Failure to use the correct sealer, the stucco would look nice at first but soon fail and peel off again.

Not suggested to attempt to do restucco or paint over existing stucco without first removing all the existing stucco. Without doing so, the final results would not look good. Appear to be a patched up job...

"My Two Cents"

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  #10  
Old 03-21-04, 06:52 PM
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I suspect that sandblasting or pressure washing will do a job on the siding. Cedar isn't a hardwood and probably won't stand up well to either method.
 
  #11  
Old 04-28-04, 05:56 AM
RoadGurl
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Thumbs up WE figured it out!!!

Alrighty eh! The spray on stucco that we simply could not get off, apart from the stuff that was peeling, comes off with...are you ready...

A blow torch and scraper!!! yep, hold the blow torch just far enough away so as not to start the house on fire, the bond or whatever it is, bubbles right up...or 'pops', right behind that zap it up with a paint scraper.

So, we are hand blow-torching, scaping our entire 1936 house. We are doing it in sections; get as much as we can done before winter then sand, seal, and paint that section to protect it. Next year the next section and so on.
Long awful job but hey! we are saving the cedar clapboard and the look of the home.

We did get quotes to replace the siding with new materials etc., thousands upon thousands of dollars...and it wouldn't look at all like the beautiful heritage home it is...so, away we go folks!

Thank you soooooo much for all your help on this one.

Cheers!
 
  #12  
Old 06-05-04, 10:27 PM
lljc00
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im considering this too

hi roadgurl (et al),

there are so many houses in my neighborhood that i bet used to be nice craftsmans before the stucco went on. i would love to buy one and restore it back to its original glory. have you been finding your restoration project (particularly about getting rid of the stucco) difficult or easy? any tips on this?

thanks!
 
  #13  
Old 06-06-04, 07:47 AM
RoadGurl
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Howdy, the job is coming along.
It's tuff going, being motivated to just get out there and do it can be daunting!!!
I put in about one half hour every day on it. It is really very easy, no-mind kinda work, stinks a bit, have to watch to not start the house on fire and I keep a hose at the ready because the stuff that comes off starts on fire!
All in all, it is labour intensive but a breeze.

My plan is to get one side done this season. Once the junk is off, seal it up and paint. Next season, I hope to get to sides done and so on.

I can't have anybody help or hire out because of the fire hazzard...so, labour of love as they say.

Overall the restoration project is coming along. Few snags..re-did the bathroom and since I did that I can smell mildew, mould..something damp and I can't find the problem. (the bathroom has wood floors, I suspect moisture is getting in from simple showering etc., the problem was somewhat relieved when I removed the bathmats for a week...still a faint smell tho..so)

Had a accident yesterday that put some burn marks into the beautiful restored fir floors...a pie plate, apple pie in it, ready to go into the oven...somebody turned on a stove burner to boil water for a cuppa and didn't notice they turned on the wrong burner...the burner they turned on was the one I had sat the pie on waiting for the oven to heat up...well, the pyrex pie plate blew up into a million bits all over the kitchen...a few of the bits were red red hot and burned the floor. Ah well, it fits the 'worn' look.

All you can do is laugh, not take it all to much to heart and carry on eh!

Let me know if you bite a project off.

Cheers!
 
  #14  
Old 06-08-04, 02:20 PM
lljc00
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you dont want your place to look too new, anyway!

the burn marks will add character to the house, and will give you stories to tell the grandkids about! i'll bet that was a pretty shocking event!

so about how many square feet do you get done in half an hour? our homes out here (bay area, ca) are pretty small. most of these are single story 2 bedroom, 1 baths, so have inside square footage of about 1000 feet. i would probably estimate the surface area at about 3,000 sq ft. so i would be curious if this would be a multi year undertaking.

i hope you are taking pictures along the way to show before, during and after! i'd love to see some of them if you have them.
 
  #15  
Old 11-08-08, 04:06 PM
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I inherited a 1952 vintage home. The original owner had Sears put a "Tex Coat" coating on the exterior of the house that carried a "never-paint-again-lifetime-warranty".

This coating is "peeling off" in several, but NOT ALL areas on the house. Sears warranty is nothing short of a "con-job" to create exclusions and then offer another coating job. Where the paint is NOT peeling, it is in very good shape.

I began "grinding, sanding, and removing" the areas that are peeling. I called a couple of "coatings" outfits and they are living in outer-space in terms of pricing. For example, they said that I can't "patch" and paint. Ironically, the garage has the same coating and I painted it two years ago and it looks like new to this day.

I am looking for a high quality base coat material to "patch"
the areas that need it and then use the same paint I used on the garage.

NEED: Help in finding a QUALITY BASE COAT ... that will enable me to repaint.
 
  #16  
Old 12-30-09, 10:03 AM
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Giving up on the siding

Hi all,

I have the same problem. I have shake siding on my attached garage and on a small portion of the house. The rest of the exterior is stucco.

Tex-cote, or something similar, was sprayed over the entire house, including the shake siding and the eaves. This coating is peeling in some places, stuck solid in others.

I have decided to just replace all of the shake with HardiPlank. The stucco is a different store. I do have a propane torch and the stucco won't burn so I might give it a go and see what happens. The eaves I'm not so sure about but I might get brave. I was considering resorting to a wire wheel to blend the edges of the stuck tex-cote with where it had peeled but this gives me some hope at least.

I've had a stucco guy look at it and specifically asked about the eaves. He mentioned that he could get everything off by 'water' blasting. I'm having a hard time figuring out how you could do that without damaging the wood but I"ve had 2 guys tell me the same thing.

I'll post pics back of some trouble areas later....glad I found this place.
 
 

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