Cultured rock vs. real rock siding

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  #1  
Old 07-22-04, 09:58 AM
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Cultured rock vs. real rock siding

Can I just pull off my wood siding, put on a new water barrier and start stacking rocks with mortar on the side of my house? Is cultured rock better than real rocks?
 
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Old 07-22-04, 06:56 PM
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Cultlured stone is more akin to installing panels than it is to installing stones. It is attractive and reasonably simple to install much as siding. Installing stone siding would be about the same as installing brick siding.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 07-23-04, 08:28 AM
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Real rock siding steps?

I would prefer using real rock for my siding. That said, can I just pull off my wood siding, put on a new water barrier and start stacking rocks with mortar on the side of my house? How do I keep the rocks from falling since the mortar won't be enough to keep the heavy rock in place?
 
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Old 07-28-04, 06:01 PM
ewohlf
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cultured stone veneer vs. quarried stone

dude, are you serious about stacking real stone adjacent to your house with some type of new vapor barrier? doesn't this sound NOT like a do-it-yourself project? you would need some type of stone ledge on foundation, supported by a footing if you were to use real stone, and what are you going to do when you encounter a WINDOW? i'd leave this one to the pros!!!

Y

ps: don't forget the metal ties...timmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmber!
 
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Old 07-29-04, 06:11 AM
HouseDr
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You definitely want to use cultured stone. It is applied to the wall rather than built on a foundation.

You would remove the old siding, install tar paper, galvanized mesh, apply a scratch coat of mortar and them start glueing the stones on the wall.

It's a tough DIY project but it can be done.
 
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Old 07-29-04, 03:44 PM
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Why not use real stone?

I think I understand the need to install real rock beginning on the foundation. Obviously, the foundation should provide a wide enough flat surface to keep the bottom row of rock from rolling away. Right? I am not a mason, but I have worked with concrete years ago, how do the ties hold rock to the wall?
 
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Old 07-29-04, 05:29 PM
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I'm going to go with the other suggestions. Man made stone would be easier for the average Home Owner. To answer your question about "Wall Ties" they are nail or screwed to the Studs then bent over on top of a Stone coarse. They are corrugated and are locked into the Bed Joint.

A Masonry wall on a House should have "Dead air" space between the Stone and the sheathing on the house.

Not saying you can't do this, it will be alot of work.
 

Last edited by themortarman; 07-29-04 at 07:37 PM.
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Old 07-30-04, 11:07 AM
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What's real rock advantage?

I feel confident I can install the cultured stone without too many mistakes. But what's the drawback of cultured stone? What's the advantage of using real rock?
 
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Old 07-30-04, 12:37 PM
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Not saying you can't do this, it will be alot of work
I was referring to Natural Stone here.

The main concern of Natural Stone is the amount to Labor involved. You will use much more Mortar, heavier Stones to move around. It can be tricky stacking stones up on a wall. A wall can fall on even the most seasoned Mason. These Culture Stone are pretty easy to get the hang of. I recommend to most people to start in the back of the house or an area that is not going to be seen as much. This way by the time your around to the focal point of the house you will be a seasoned pro.
 

Last edited by themortarman; 07-30-04 at 05:39 PM.
  #10  
Old 07-31-04, 04:28 AM
HouseDr
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There are no drawbacks to cultured stone unless you are a purist.
 
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Old 07-31-04, 05:58 AM
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Originally Posted by HouseDr
There are no drawbacks to cultured stone unless you are a purist.
Very Good point. The Cultured Stone looks real most people can't even tell the difference.
 
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Old 08-02-04, 08:48 AM
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Who can tell real from cultured?

Originally Posted by themortarman
Very Good point. The Cultured Stone looks real most people can't even tell the difference.
TheMortarman,
Thanks for all your help so far. I saw some cultured stone from Owens Corning this weekend on a public works job site. I liked what I saw but don't know if I was looking at natural rock or cultured rock. Would only masons and quarry workers know by looking if a rock is cultured or not?
 
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Old 08-02-04, 09:13 AM
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The cultued Stone would be alot thinner then real Stone. If would be anywhere fron 1 1\2" to 2 " thick, while real Building Stone would be 4", 5", 6" or more thick.

Yes, the average person could not tell the difference from the street even up close it is almost impossible to tell for the average person. Masons and people that are in the Cultured Stone industry could tell. Maybe, not at first glance though.
 
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Old 08-24-04, 10:32 AM
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Lava Rock

I'm also interested in replacing my siding with rock, but I would like to use lava rock. I know it's very light, so might it be possible to not have to build it up from the foundation? Or as an alternative, is there a cultured version of lava rock that might be even lighter? (I've done many searches with no success.) I'd be putting the lava rock on a portion of the house that has a strange bumpout, so there's no foundation to build up on.

Thanks for any advice!
 
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Old 08-25-04, 12:14 PM
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Lava rock for sale

Originally Posted by lawebchick
I'm also interested in replacing my siding with rock, but I would like to use lava rock. I know it's very light, so might it be possible to not have to build it up from the foundation? Or as an alternative, is there a cultured version of lava rock that might be even lighter? (I've done many searches with no success.) I'd be putting the lava rock on a portion of the house that has a strange bumpout, so there's no foundation to build up on.

Thanks for any advice!
The cultured stone web sites have diy instructions which say something about not building it up from the foundation. In fact, they recommend starting from the top to avoid mortar drips on the stones below. I have some lava rock siding (at least that is what it looks like to me) but mainly wood and want to replace it with cultured stone someday. When it comes time to remove what I have, I will gladly sell it you .
 
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Old 08-26-04, 08:49 AM
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It's a deal!

It's a deal - you're not too far from me :-)
Leave another message when you're ready to rip stuff down! Unless you're like me and plan on procrastinating for a few years...
 
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Old 08-27-04, 08:41 AM
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Might be a year or two

Originally Posted by lawebchick
It's a deal - you're not too far from me :-)
Leave another message when you're ready to rip stuff down! Unless you're like me and plan on procrastinating for a few years...
If you are willing to come take it, I will give it to you for free. There isn't that much of it, maybe a 2' X 8' section. I plan to start either next summer or the one after. I'll post back when I know for sure.
 
  #18  
Old 10-03-04, 12:27 PM
jodac
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Is this possible...

My cedar siding is in very poor shape. In the local massive hardware store I came up with an idea. What am I missing..

Remove current cedar siding
place a water barrier.
Put up tile backing boards(3x5)
Tile with slate tiles.

Would have the look of slate...

any thoughts..

Thank you....
 
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Old 10-04-04, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by jodac
My cedar siding is in very poor shape. In the local massive hardware store I came up with an idea. What am I missing..

Remove current cedar siding
place a water barrier.
Put up tile backing boards(3x5)
Tile with slate tiles.

Would have the look of slate...

any thoughts..

Thank you....
My thought is to run your plan by the city/county building inspector. They will know if anything in your area is a known problem and that knowledge could save you lots of time and dollars later.

As an example, I am in California and because of the earthquakes, there is a danger that the weight of the rock, cultured or not, would shift in a quake, which would put a lot of weight on the wall itself instead of the foundation. I discussed my siding idea with a friend who is a structural engineer. He explained all of the details of weight transfer. I would have never thought of this danger if he had not pointed it out to me.
 
  #20  
Old 03-02-06, 12:34 PM
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Lava Rock

Part of my exterior is lava rock, and I would like to add some more on another wall. Any idea where to find it?
 
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Old 03-05-06, 06:07 PM
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I gotta ask

Is lava rock making a comeback? If you are in California, try a building supply store. I plan on taking mine off someday, hopefully within a year or two, and you are welcome to it.
 
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