Need help installing vent in vinyl siding

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-12-05, 01:00 PM
Andrew's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 953
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Need help installing vent in vinyl siding

I know nothing about siding.
I am installing a range hood in my kitchen, and need to install a 3-1/4" x 10" vent on the outside. My old house had wood siding, then covered with some sort of tan/brown fake brick siding (asbestos ? asphault?), THEN covered by vinyl siding.
What is the best and neatest way to install this vent on the outside wall? Should I simply screw the vent directly into the vinyl siding, or should I cut away the vinyl, and secure it to the fake brick siding. Is there some sort of vinyl edging I can buy to cover the cut edges of the siding?

How would a pro do it????
Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-12-05, 02:19 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,129
Received 194 Votes on 180 Posts
Andy,

It kind of depends what your vent comes with... what I mean is, does it come with enough duct to extend through your wall? And does it come with a "hood" that installs on the outside of the house, that perhaps has a flapper on it? If so, I would take down a couple pieces of vinyl siding where the vent is going to be, and mark where the vent will go on the inside of the house. You will need to cut 2 holes, (one through the drywall, and one through all your layers of siding) and it would be nice if you make the hole just slightly bigger than the vent.

The trick is getting the hole on the inside and the hole on the outside to line up. I like to mark the exact center of the hole and using a long drill bit, drill right through the wall (being careful to hold the drill level and square with the wall.) This will mark the center of your hole, which you can then draw a rectangle around, so that the cut you make on the inside will match the cut you make on the outside.

Before you install the vent, I like to make a mounting block 3/4" to 1 1/2" thick for the vent to attach to. If your vent is 3 1/2" x 11 1/2" for example, I might make the block 6 1/2" x 14 1/2". You would also need to cut a hole in this mounting block for the vent to pass through. Making this block out of 1 or 2 pieces of 3/4 plywood seems to work well, since it won't split on you.

This mounting block will then get covered with a piece of white aluminum trim coil... again, with a hole cut out for the vent to pass through. (It would also be a good idea to make a drip cap flashing over the mounting block, and flash it behind the other layers of old siding.)

Around the mounting block, you can then install vinyl j-channel, and your vinyl siding will get cut out to go around the whole thing. Provided you have a hood, you can then mount it to the mounting block. If you prefer, you could spray paint the hood to match your house a little better.

So that's the hard way of doing it.

The easy way is to buy a mounting block that is the right color for your vinyl siding. The JUMBO or RECESSED JUMBO at http://www.midamericabuilding.com/PD...tingBlocks.pdf might be the way to go.

It should have a snap ring that goes on after you have installed your vinyl siding to fit around it. Good luck finding one!
 
  #3  
Old 02-12-05, 06:02 PM
Andrew's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 953
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks X,
That's exactly what I needed.
I will make a block as you described. When I went to your link, all I saw was a blank page. I think something is goofy with the Adobe reader on my computer.
 
  #4  
Old 02-12-05, 09:13 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,129
Received 194 Votes on 180 Posts
the Adobe PDF's do take a very long time to load, and even after it is loaded, a while before your computer can display the images. (Sometimes I'll open a 2nd window and let it work in the background while I'm doing something else.)
 
  #5  
Old 02-16-05, 10:38 AM
nerdo5
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The exterior part of the exhaust hood should have a flange of some sort (usually 5/8"). When i did my hood, the hole was about 1/4" larger than the duct, so the flange covered the hole. I just screwed it directly to my siding, using long screws to grab the sheathing beneath the vinyl. Then i went around the whole perimeter of the flange with some exterior caulk to close it in completely. This is the neatest way to do it, IMHO.
 
  #6  
Old 02-19-05, 01:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,210
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Water predictably obeys gravity and we exploit that so that caulking (which can fail) is unnecessary. Make sure all surfaces that can get wet direct water outward, or run it off before water has a chance to creep around them. That's the essence of weatherproofing.

Siding is just rows of drip edges. Any addition to the exterior wall should start directly behind a drip edge (the real one, where two pieces overlap), so that water would have to run uphill to get behind the added surface. The vent should be positioned relative to the siding.

The easiest way to position a vent is to drill a small hole through from inside, allowing this may not be the centre but turn out as an edge to the final hole. Then go out with hood in hand and mark the final duct hole such that the hood top will just tuck under a course of siding, with some prying at the springy siding. For smaller hoods on wide siding, where the trial hole has a chance of landing too low on a piece of siding, a rough measure should get it within range.

I put a thick bead of caulking around the vent pipe itself before inserting it, but this is more to stop air than water. A single screw at the bottom (again, behind a dripping edge) secures the hood, which is held in at the top by siding.

Wow Andrew, your house has a lot of layers to fight through. But this all helps insulate, it's good.
 
  #7  
Old 02-22-05, 07:30 PM
Andrew's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 953
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thumbs up

Thanks for the additional info. It is an 83 year old house which has been remodeled a few times. Unfortunately, they never added insulation
I probably won't get to this job until spring--it's just too cold here to start opening exterior walls right now.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: