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Covering existing windows to make them maintenance free

Covering existing windows to make them maintenance free

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  #1  
Old 05-03-05, 01:23 PM
2wheelbob
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Covering existing windows to make them maintenance free

Hi,

I am having my house resided and am considering having my wood windows covered in either aluminum or vinyl to make the maintenance free at the same time. While the maintenance free upkeep sounds great...I am concerned about moisture getting under the covering and rotting my windows over time.

I would appreicate hearing any feedback, advice or experience any of you might have.

Thanks in advance for your help!
Bob
 
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  #2  
Old 05-03-05, 04:58 PM
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The biggest problem I encounter when working on windows are people who did such a poor job on the aluminum cladding that they trapped water inside the cladding and rotted out the wood sills underneath.

The problem with wrapping wood windows is that it's hard to keep the water out. There are several points where water might get in, if they do a poor job of it.

If you are considering this seriously, perhaps it would be a good idea to inspect some of the company's work and see how it looks. Some guys really do a poor job of cladding, so it would be worth your time to go look at their work. If you see lots of ugly caulking, they probably aren't very good craftsmen. Specifically, look for clean tight angles where the vertical trim meets the sill. Also, "think like a drip" and see if you can detect any places where water might be able to get in. The biggest problem areas are at the bottom corners of the storm windows.

Also keep in mind that when covering the exterior trim with trim coil, they won't be covering the window sashes, so you'll still be painting them regardless. So it will just be less to paint, not totally maintenance free. If you are ever thinking of replacing your windows down the road, they can wrap your windows then, and likely do a 100% better job of it.
 
  #3  
Old 05-03-05, 05:44 PM
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Window Wrapping

2wheelBob:
In over 30 years my company has wrapped alot of windows. A whole lot of windows. I have found that there are two things to do when wrapping windows or doors. All angles should fold toward the house, and folds always fold downward. All fold edges should be caulked with 100% silicone. When looking at a properly wrapped window, you should not see any seams, unless you are looking up from the bottom. I will add a couple of other things. Wrapping windows is not cheap. It is expensive. A good wrapper might take all day to wrap one window. If they do 2 normal size windows in a day, they are going too fast. It is like tuck pointing. Very slow and methodical. Not everyone can wrap windows, but alot of people think they can. It is an art. Good Luck
 
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Old 05-03-05, 09:14 PM
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The windows and fascia were wrapped in aluminum on my house in 1982 and have held up fine. So it will work.
 
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Old 05-03-05, 09:41 PM
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Realistially there's always a chance of mositure, but if done properly it cuts down alot of that chance. I dont agree with the 1 window a day and think that's very excessive for anybody that knows what they're doing IMO, but I do now when I cap windows compared tosome of the "other crews" in my area, I am slow. Usually it takes approximately 30 minutes per opening to actually install it-with another guy bending.

Caulk is NOT your best friend when capping, if excessive caulk is used, workmanship is usually shoddey since they're covering up poor fitting joints.
 
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Old 05-03-05, 10:29 PM
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Got to agree with you, IHI. Hey, would you like to see some of my work? I took a few photos as examples. You can see them at: http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/thexsl...bum?.dir=/53b3

These windows were wrapped before installing the new replacement windows. They were old Anderson casements, and I reciprocated off one of the step sills and filled another one up with a filler to give the sill a "normal" slope. Also had to add in some fillers before adding on the 3/4 blind stop. I like to caulk underneath the sill cladding to ensure that there will be no air infiltration under my window. (I imagine that it also helps to prevent condensation during the winter, when warm air from the house could condense when it meets the cold ambient air.) You'll notice the flaps that get bent where the stop and brickmould meet the sill. (A dab of caulk seals that corner) The back side of the blind stop also gets caulked to stop air there also. On brick houses I like to make a finish trim and slip my metal into that. I use as little caulk and as few visible nails as possible. Once everything is done and cleaned up, I'll caulk the perimeters before calling it a day.
 
  #7  
Old 05-04-05, 05:36 AM
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Excellent looking job X, so again I ask when you coming to Iowa!! Most extravagant thing I ever did with the brake was custom cap literally every piece of the entire exterior of an addition we built. No siding-the cap work became the siding. Colors was the homies idea, think i would've done the layout a little different had it been me. Between you and me though, I hate capping windows LOL, especially on the houses where every window is different. http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2004-...cfaddition.jpg
 
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Old 05-04-05, 04:21 PM
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Ha ha, thanks, Josh! I ought to be pretty good at it, after doing it almost every day for the past 14 years. I don't mind doing it, as long as it isn't windy! 99% of the windows I wrap, I do it after I've torn the old window out, which makes it a LOT easier, and you can do a better job of sealing everything up. If there were two of me, my clone could move to Iowa and work for you, guaranteed.

Holy cow, that looks like quite the wrap job! Now that might have taken a whole day, aye? I got a nice picture today at work of how a wrap job should NOT look, I'll have to upload it later this evening.
 
  #9  
Old 05-04-05, 07:13 PM
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OK, here's an example of how NOT to wrap a window. This was a basement window that was wrapped by someone who DIDN'T do a very nice job.

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/thexsl...bum?.dir=/c58b

It's a perfect example of what I was saying earlier, regarding how some contractors wrap windows so poorly that they allow water to get trapped under the cladding. These windows were in danger of rotting right out of the house. Not sure why he bothered caulking any of it when there is a large gaping hole at the bottom of the brickmould?
 
  #10  
Old 05-04-05, 07:19 PM
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What do you think is wrong with that??!!
 
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Old 05-05-05, 12:03 AM
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Xsleeper

I looked at your slide show on your link. You do good work.
 
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