How to repair rotting T1-11?

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Old 02-10-06, 06:14 AM
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Question How to repair rotting T1-11?

The siding on my house consists of T1-11 over felt paper attached to the 2x4 studs. I have several areas of rotted siding that I want to replace without replacing the whole 4'x8' sheet of siding. The size of the rotted area ranges from 4"x4" to 24"x24". My question is what is the best way to repair these areas? I'm concerned about cutting into the felt paper and reinforcing the patched areas. Is it best to try and cut out a section from stud to stud?

Thanks for your help!
 
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Old 02-10-06, 06:53 AM
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It is best to replace a whole sheet at a time - or atleast a section from top to bottom. This eliminates a patched up look and future problems from the patch letting in moisture.

The correct way to patch would be to remove a section [from stud to stud], repair tar paper if necesarry, install flashing and then the new piece of plywood.

I suppose you could just cut out a small area and insert a piece of new, caulking it well but it would only be a temporary solution.
 
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Old 02-10-06, 08:50 AM
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I agree with marksr 100%. T1-11 can't be patched in very well, because it will begn to rot along the edges of any "patch" you try to make- caulking it would only be a temporary fix and would not make the repair disappear. Replacing the entire panel is the best way to go. T1-11 requires a z-flashing anywhere there is a horizontal seam (such as between 1st and 2nd story courses of siding) and installing a z-bar above a small patch is usually not practical or ascetically pleasing.

You are right to be concerned about cutting through the tarpaper. But if you replace an entire piece, you shouldn't have to do any cutting. Start by removing all the nails with a cat's paw / crows foot nail puller. Then you should be able to remove and replace the entire piece without ANY cutting.
 
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Old 02-11-06, 01:31 PM
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To further Marksr and XSleeper, whole pieces are the best bet. You should find the overlap side, depending on how it was put up. Usually it is on the right side. Begin pulling it from this side first, to avoid having too much tear out on the underlay side.
 
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Old 05-23-06, 10:12 AM
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Back to top!!

I am having the same problem. I have an older brick ranch house that has a utility room added on which does not have brick siding. I've just gotten done a few months ago with painting the trim and front porch on the rest of the house. I was going to use behr paint and primer before visiting this forum but got some BM instead. It was a lot of work preparing the surface, esp the porch I don't think the previous owners did anything but slap paint on top of paint. So now it looks beautiful again.

Except for the back of the house. There was a drainage problem and the previous owners simply piled dirt against the siding to get water to drain away from the house - I guess. We made a stone patio (which caused splashing, fixed one problem caused another) and had some rot fixed. Well now I want to paint this siding but much of it seems to be rotted. I fixed crumbling mildewy drywall about a year and a half ago from the inside that was caused from neglect and poor planning. It seems to be holding up OK. We have some cheap gutters and want to get better ones. I had someone come out to look at the siding and he suggested just patching it. Yestereday I was poking around the other wall and the rot is much worse on the bottem. The guy that looked at it claimed he could not find matching siding, I guess it's that T1-11 stuff, it's the vertical plank siding.

Replaceing the siding will be a pain because there are 4 windows the siding will have to fit around. I don't have the money right now to simply have this room redone, I had to get a new HVAC unit last summer plus some other repairs and am tapped out at the moment. If there was a way I could easily and cheaply fix it so it would last about 5 years (I plan on getting bathrooms remodeled at that time and would plan for this as well) that would be fine to.

Sometimes I wish I just lived in a trailor. The neighbors got some new bathroom fixtures and wound up having to have all of their pipes replaced, running them in the attic or something like that, whatever they do with pipes in slab houses. I am almost afraid to have my bathrooms remodeled.

I will include pics soon, maybe I should have just started my own thread. I have some wood epoxy, and some of that stuff you put on rotting wood to restore it. If I could find matching siding it seems like it would be easier to chop the old stuff off below the windows (like I did the drywall) and put up the new stuff and patch the seams. Right now I need a quick fix to prevent my whole room from rotting.
 
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Old 05-23-06, 02:46 PM
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The problem with patching any plywood type siding is the joint. To do it correctly you would need to use flashing under the top piece and over the bottom - unsightly. You could also butt the joint and use caulking but if/when the caulking fails, the water damage starts over again.

I have occasionally used durhams rock hard putty to repair minor damage but it sounds like your damage might be to extensive.

Although T-111 styles vary slightly [different manufactures] I don't believe it would be a noticable difference if whole panels were replaced and then painted. What little T-111 I have replaced, the biggest difference I noticed afterwards was a trained eye could tell that the new panels were new - less weathering and paint build up.
 
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