Removing Siding to Insulate

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Old 03-29-06, 09:12 PM
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Removing Siding to Insulate

I have 40+ year old vertical cedar siding. I am have 3 weatherization contractors bid for insulating my house (attic, crawl, and walls). 2 out of the 3 contractors just want to drill holes through siding and patch them. The third contractor, and the one I like so far, wants to remove the siding drill through the sheathing, and rehang the siding when the insulation is in. Is this normal? I don't know if my siding can handle the up and down and don't want to be suprised with a higher bill when some of it has to be replaced because of breaking.

The house is a single level ranch about 1600 sqft. I have no idea how much replacing siding would cost.
 
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Old 03-30-06, 01:43 PM
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I'm thinking the third one's got the best idea. I mean, what's easier? It would appear that using a crowbar to pull away one strip of cedar siding and then renailing it is more effective than patching lots of holes. Anyway, the guy might be able to save the pieces he's pulling away. If he doesn't, well, painting replacement pieces is more or less the same as painting the patches.

I want to remove aluminum siding but its not as simple as using a crowbar.
 
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Old 03-30-06, 08:19 PM
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The removal is obviously the best method since your not left with plugs in every wall cavity. BUT cedar-especially older cedar becomes very brittle so cracking/breaking is most likely to happen. Not to mention how does he plan to remove the nails holding up the planks wihtout scarring and marring? Cedar is very soft so any digging with a cat's paw will leave impressions so realistically you might as well figure on replacing whatever panels he removes just to be same.

Measure your existing siding exposure. If the exposure is 6" or less your fine since that dimension planks are readily available and priced fair for what they are. If you have 8" exposure get ready to crack open your wallet for replacement boards. We did an addition and to match up to existing house we had to special order 10" cedar and it ran us $100+tax PER board.
 
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Old 04-14-06, 09:30 AM
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Using a flat metal shield piece for the crowbar saves the cedar board above or below from the cats-paw. I've used shields to save drywall and plaster successfully.

As for board replacement, it is true that its expensive to replace. But I think a line of boards once round the house's perimetre may end up cheaper than the labour involved in patching drilled holes.

At least, there's no risk of seeing the patches. Only risk is that the paint on the replacement boards will not match the rest of the house owing to fading.

J
 
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Old 05-01-06, 06:41 PM
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insulation behind siding

Sorry if a little off subject here, but I need to ask this as it does pertain to the post. When drilling holes and I suppose spraying or pumping insulation in the walls, do you get charged for the full square footage or is it adjusted for the firebelt going around the house about half way up/down the wall? In this part of the country ( NW Alabama), the 2x4 between the studs are known as fire belt, I think. It is what I know them as anyway.
 
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Old 05-01-06, 08:07 PM
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You get charged for the full square footage, since if done correctly they will bore holes above/below the fire stop anyways. If done correctly it is ludicris to think you'd deduct for the small amount of insulation that the horizontal 2x4 is replacing...heck, they'll throw more than that away that's leaked onto the ground.
 
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Old 05-02-06, 12:53 PM
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siding insulating

it would be ludicrous to be concerned about the 2X4 itself. I was referring to the space below it. Actually, the question itself was ludicrous since any reputable insulator would drill two holes. My bad. I was thinking of one guy that told me a few years ago about people not getting their moneys worth because of the cavity below the belt. I think he might be one that would pull that trick. The same guy that told me about how you can spray anti-freeze on the insulation in the hopper to make it swell. He just happened to have some on his truck in a spray bottle. He never got any of my money! I have worked in and around several trades. It is amazing what some people will do. Kind of makes me want to strike out as a contractor on my own rather than maybe be associated with some of this stuff.
 
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Old 05-02-06, 01:58 PM
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I know alot of guys/companies used to only drill 1 hole to fill wall cavities, but good guys/companies know in order to pack the cavity the best you can requires you go at the thing from the middloe and top of the wall, otherwise if going in at top of wall only it will bridge the insulation and you might only get the top 1/3 filled...have done many a remodel I've seen this first hand once the plaster/sheetrock was removed.

I've never heard of the anti freeze thing, sounds like a horse remedy since I wonder why water alone would not do the same thing and quite a few guys with the modern machines actually mist water onto the insulation to make it stick and hold in place when doing vertical surfaces.

Even after being in this business as long as I have I am very humble and often second guess myself on everything, but typically all i need to do is visit a different jobsite and see what's being done and that's all the ego boost I need to know I'm doing things a whole lot better (and correctly) than others that claim to be contractors.
 
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Old 05-02-06, 02:06 PM
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Know eaxactly what you mean about the second guessing and seeing other ppl's work. I gues, know the reason I seem so slow is that I really try to do the best I can.

P.S. It is my understanding that the anti-freeze had no purpose but to make it look like there was more insulation than there was and it would deflate after a while. I could be wrong on that.
 
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