Is Rotted Window sill repairable?

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Old 04-18-06, 02:48 AM
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Is Rotted Window sill repairable?

I have a window on a house that has the sill on the exterior rotted. I have had ones that the nose piece has been rotted before and I have replaced the nose piece. This window has the sill rotted past just the nose. Is it possible to replace just the sill? Or and I going to have to pull the whole window out and replace the whole window unit? THanks.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 05:36 AM
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It can be done, but it's a lot easier after you've done it 100 times. Doing it the first time is pretty tough. You will definately need a reciprocating saw to cut any finish nails in your trim, such as your stool or casing. If you don't cut these, you might split your trim. You also need to cut the old sill out with the reciprocating saw. What I do is cut a 12" section out of the middle and remove it first. After you do that it's much easier to remove the pieces that are left on each side. If there are nails or staples left in the jambs on each side, you snip them off.

After you get the old sill out, it's just a matter of fashioning a new one that is exactly the same size and angle as the old one. Then getting it into place with insulation and sealing the edges, attaching it to the rough opening and the trim is the final step.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 06:44 AM
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Like Sleeper said, it gets easier with time. I think my first one took me 3 hours. Now they take me about 45 minutes, start to finish. The correct tools make it alot easier. Good Luck ps I did one about 2 weeks ago, and I did it so fast, I did not even charge the people for the job. Its just that easy.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 09:49 AM
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I used to keep a profile of my sills in my shop. I would make them 6-8 at a time. I made them out of yellow pine stair treads. I provided replacement sills for my house and both my neighbors. Now we all have vinyl - no sill problems. Of course we are ruining the environment and putting future generations at risk with the vinyl.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 02:35 PM
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question about the sill replacement

Ok, I really don't want to sound stupid here but I am going to ask anyway. First thanks for letting me know it could be done. Second, when you guys talk about cutting out the old window sill and using a sawsall to cut nails are you removing more than just the bottom window sill? And on the reinstallation of the new sill. How are you attaching it to the window casing. I hope I am not using the wrong terms. If so sorry. I am going to take this on I think but I want to make sure I am clear on how you are doing it. I know the sill is not going to just sit on the rough opening of the wall. I am unsure of the connecting the new sill I guess. Thanks a ton for your great help.

Ken
 
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Old 04-18-06, 06:18 PM
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As a rule, the sill does sit on the rough opening of the wall. Also, a window sill is just a piece of 2x6 or 2x8. It is a separate piece of the casing. It attaches to the sides of the casing with finish nails usually. Some are screwed it. They slide in under the casing. The job is done from the outside of the house. Hope this helps. Good Luck
 
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Old 04-18-06, 10:11 PM
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thanks, I did not know this. I thought that it was much thinner. I also thought it was supported off of the rough opening. If I could ask another thing, so when I cut the old one out are you saying that I should be able to slide the new on in on the bottom?

here is a link to what I was expecting to find when tearing into the sill. that is why I didn't think the sill actually sat on the rough opening.

http://www.tpub.com/content/construc.../14044_207.htm

Plus I was looking at some other sites that had sill replacement info and I have another question. When you make this repair, are you doing it with the window still in place or are you removing the window to replace the sill then reinstalling the window?

You help is great and thanks.
 

Last edited by kmeyer301; 04-18-06 at 10:34 PM.
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Old 04-19-06, 05:38 AM
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If you look at the window in the picture on the web site you sent in your letter you will notice two things. first, The picture is from the inside. With this said, you will notice that under the sill is a 2 x 4. You can see the end sticking out. This is part of the rough window framing in the wall. Not part of the window. that does not come out. The sill (2 x 6) is sitting on this rough framing. You take your sawsall and cut along under the 2x6 to cut off the nails in the 2x4 under it. You leave the window in place. The outside picture shows a narrow stool and some casing. Not all windows have these. If you have them take them off carefully, as you will have to reinstall them after you have replaced the sill. It does help if you can open the window while working on it. Also, every house is different, and every window is different. You may have to remove some outside casing or trim to start with, it just depends on your house. Good Luck
 
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Old 04-19-06, 06:06 AM
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Thanks. It is clearer now. Just to let you know so that you don't think you are helping a total rookie, I did know that the
2x4 was the rough opening. I have actually build a small house for my mother and added a 3 car garage to my house. I was just unsure about getting the sill out without taking the window out. I was not sure it could be done until the help that I have recieved here. Thanks again and if I run into any problems I will post more questions here. It will probably be a week or so before I have clear day and a day off together to do this. But you have been very helpful.
 
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Old 04-19-06, 12:45 PM
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Your very welcome. I knew by the wording in your first question that you were not a rookie. Those types of things can be puzzeling and sometimes hard to picture. Glad we could help. Have a good day.
 
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Old 04-20-06, 10:12 PM
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I want to ask you one more thing before I start this. At the beginning of this question and response session there was a comment about using a sawsall to cut the nails. Is that the way that you seperate the sill from the casing sides at the bottom? If not how do you get the sill free from the side casing with out damaging the casing? I do have a sawsall, so that is not a problem.
 
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Old 04-21-06, 04:27 AM
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Yes, I use a sawsall. I use the short metal blade. Good Luck.
 
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Old 05-01-06, 07:22 PM
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window sill replacement

Do I feel like a rookie?! I have replace 3 sills on my house and removed the whole widow each time . BUt on my old house the sill does not actually sit on the window. It slides ina n angled groove in the casing. This angle appears to be 75 degrees on my speed square so I set the saw on 15 degrees. Now I'm guessing I could have removed sections as mentioned and then toe-nailed the sill back to the casing. Another goof I did this last time is I did not center the window when I set it back in the rough opening. The window is at the kitchen sink with cabinet very close to both sides. Too close now on one side . I will have to readjust the window or do someting with the interior trim now. Actually I was going for a kind of temp fix anyway. I noticed the window was not attached to the rough opening, only held in by the interior and exterior trim.
 
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Old 05-03-06, 05:37 AM
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Yes, you are correct. In many of the old houses the sills are put in at a steep angle, and some are notched into the casing. Every house is different. 75 degrees is a very steep angle. but you got it done, and thats the main thing. What did you learn from this? Alot of experience. And in construction, alot of experience is worth a whole lot more then a whole pile of books.
Good for you and have a great day.
 
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Old 05-04-06, 06:47 AM
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"And in construction, alot of experience is worth a whole lot more then a whole pile of books."

As in so many areas, nothing like hands on.
 
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Old 10-07-08, 05:16 PM
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Question

Originally Posted by boman View Post
BUt on my old house the sill does not actually sit on the window. It slides ina n angled groove in the casing. This angle appears to be 75 degrees on my speed square so I set the saw on 15 degrees. Now I'm guessing I could have removed sections as mentioned and then toe-nailed the sill back to the casing.


Well I have HW windows from 1991 in my modern colonial and teh double pane thermal all wood windows have teh sill slid into a angled groove in the lower frame as well? But took the apron off inside and could not hammer the rotted sill out of the frame groove from the inside. how can IO get it out without distroying the lower frame bellow the sill?
 
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Old 05-30-10, 01:27 PM
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Jack the Contractor said: "The job is done from the outside of the house."

I have several window sills that need to be replaced in a two-storey house. I can reach the one downstairs, but the upstairs are impossible. I am a 74-year-old grandma, and climbing ladders would not be a good idea for me. So is there any way I can do this from the inside?

Thanks for your help,
Bairie
 
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Old 05-30-10, 05:14 PM
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Yes it can be replaced from the inside, but only by someone with good carpenter experience. It is very tricky. good Luck
 
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