A stopping point for residing?

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Old 08-14-06, 05:19 PM
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A stopping point for residing?

I am a week or two away from starting to replace my Batten & Board with Hardie lap siding. I am slightly concerned with just where a stopping point is for winter. Heck I may get it done but I'd like to have a plan if I can't. I am resheathing with 1/2 inch plywood and using Tyvek between it and the Hardie siding. As long as I'm well sheathed should the Tyvek get me by for a while? You see new construction that way all the time. Obviously they have less concern for property at that point. I guess my real concern is I don't want to be reluctant to turn a corner and keep going for fear of a weather change. Rain and snow are inevitable at some point during this job. I chose this route over baking in the 100 degree temps. It seems to me as though you'd have to at least start both sides of an outside corner to get the new siding tied together correctly.

Any opinions
Thanks
Dave
 
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Old 08-14-06, 05:36 PM
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Yes, if the top edge of your Tyvek is sealed so as to not allow water to enter at the top, you should have no problem with your project, provided the Tyvek is covered within 120 days.

That is the amount of time that Tyvek suggests their product can be exposed before it's qualities begin to degrade due to weathering.

Source: http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek_Construction/en_US/uses_apps/installers/FAQ_installers.html
 
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Old 08-14-06, 05:45 PM
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Thanks XSleeper that makes me feel a little better. I was going to staple the Tyvek for the most part but would probably use the big plastic washered nails if I needed to stop.
 
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Old 08-14-06, 05:52 PM
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yes, plastic cap nails work well in windy areas. Additionally, the Tyvek tape that is made for seams will help keep them from blowing open, and will enable the Tyvek to perform as advertised.
 
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Old 08-14-06, 06:02 PM
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I left one wall of a garage with exposed Tyvek for most of a winter, probably 3 months. Too much cold and snow to finish the job. When i started again, the Tyvek looked like the day i put it on. I was surprised there was no fading, fraying or rips.
 
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Old 08-14-06, 06:18 PM
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Thanks Wayne. I'm especially glad to hear your's weathered well. That was one of my concerns. And XSleeper I will certainly be using the Tyvek tape. Thanks again.
 
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