Small hole in siding-need to fix

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  #1  
Old 08-23-06, 08:25 PM
doorjam
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Small hole in siding-need to fix

hey all. i had a weedwhacker punch a 1" hole in a flat, white vinyl siding panel. its small and clse to the ground, so replacing the whole panel willprobably be the last resort. is there any way to cover it over with another piece of vinyl siding or this metal?


i was thinking maybe patch it with heavy duty epoxy?

any suggestions/advice welcome. thanks
 
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Old 08-23-06, 08:39 PM
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My suggestion would be to replace the entire piece, since it is fairly easy to do. If you don't want to do that, you might as well just caulk it with an appropriate color of siding caulk, because a patch wouldn't look any better than a glob of caulk.

Those weed whackers sure are hard on vinyl siding!
 
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Old 08-23-06, 09:08 PM
doorjam
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hmm, so theres no real way to camoflauge a patch?

But about the caulk, would there be any obvious or significant differences between it and the surrounding siding?


thanks for the time.
 
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Old 08-24-06, 05:11 AM
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I agree replacing the whole piece is best. You might be able to overlay a short piece over the damaged area. I wouldn't use caulking, unless painted it will attract dirt!!.... and I doubt you could patch with caulk and it not be very noticable.

If you rearrange your landscaping so you don't need to weed eat where the vinyl is close to the ground, you can avoid a repeat of this situation.
 
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Old 08-24-06, 05:51 AM
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I go along with the others - replacing the entire piece is the way to go. It is easy, and inexpensive.

However, if you decide to go with a patch, put it behind the siding, instead of on the outside - it will be less noticeable that way. Clean up the edges of the hole, and patch with a piece of siding glued behind the damaged section. You can use silicone caulk as your adhesive, but don't leave any of it showing (as was mentioned earlier, it will attract dirt).
 
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Old 08-24-06, 09:53 AM
doorjam
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thanks for the tips.

now, assuming i want to patch it from the inside, how would i go about doing that, since i only have limited access from the outside.

keep the tips coming. they are much appreciated.
 
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Old 08-24-06, 12:18 PM
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You have to un-hook the bottom of that piece of siding, to gain access underneath - which is half the effort of just replacing the entire piece - part of the reason to suggest replacing versus repairing.

Any of the big box stores sell a small tool used to "un-zip" the siding. You slip it under the edge at the bottom of the piece above the one you want to remove, raise it enough to catch the edge hooked on the piece below the one you are un-zipping, then pull down and out to un-hook the edge. Start at an end, or seam. Once you have a few inches un-hooked, the rest will come un-hooked easily, by just pulling on the siding. Pull the nails from the piece you are replacing, and push it down to un-hook it from the piece below. Use the piece you removed as a template for the replacement. Hook the new piece on and re-nail, being careful to leave the nail heads up slightly, to allow the siding to expand/contract with temperature changes. After the replacement is nailed, re-hook the bottom edge of the piece above the replacement. You can use the tool to pull it down, (and shove down to temporarily stretch the siding) to re-hook, again starting at an end or seam. You should then be able to slide the tool along the bottom edge, along with some gentle persuasion from the heel of your hand, to re-hook the rest of the piece. Same process to repair, except you un-hook/re-hook only the piece you are repairing, not the one above it.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 08-24-06, 08:15 PM
doorjam
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thanks for the time. will sell what works best.
 
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