Hardiplank Clearance Question


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Old 10-12-06, 11:39 AM
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Hardiplank Clearance Question

I would like to put up hardiplank for my siding. I am siding only a tiny section. The rest of the house is brick. I do not have the necessary 6 inch clearance between the top of the soil and the bottom of the first plank.

Can I simply install the siding and then trench out 2-3 inches and 6 inches deep?

If not, are there any other alternatives?

Thanks...
 
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Old 10-12-06, 03:38 PM
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Digging a trench isn't the best option, because that trench will eventually get filled with wet leaves, snow, and finally dirt. Hardi doesn't want their product close to the ground for fear it could be in constant contact with something wet.

Your options are:

Install a flashing near grade underneath the siding. Painted aluminum trim coil would be fine. The top of this flashing would be tucked behind and would be covered with your building paper. Then your starter piece and first row of siding would start on top of that.

Install a skirt board (rough cedar or Miritec) along the bottom of the wall that would be the appropriate width. Top the skirt board with a drip cap. The top of the drip cap would be tucked behind and would be covered with your building paper. Then your starter piece and first row of siding would start on top of that.
 
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Old 10-12-06, 04:47 PM
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Thanks for the ideas, I think I will go the skirt board route. It does bring another question to mind though. I am planning on attaching to the studs 1/2 inch OSB as sheathing, on top of that #30 roof felt.

The way you had described it, it sounds like I should apply the OSB, then the skirt board, then the flashing, and finally the roof felt over the top of the flashing, i.e. no roof felt between the skirt and osb. Is this correct?

Also, the sill plate is recessed a few inches from the edge of the slab. Is it ok to allow the OSB/skirt to touch the slab? Or should there be a small gap that is caulked?

Thanks...
 
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Old 10-12-06, 08:11 PM
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I would apply the felt to cover the sheathing entirely, then apply the skirt. Then cut the felt with a knife approximately 1/2" above the skirt. Slip your drip cap flashing into that slit so that it goes underneath the felt.

Ideally, OSB should not contact the cement, as it could draw up moisture into the wood. Leaving a gap and caulking it would be better, if that is what you intend to do. You will want to let your felt hang over the OSB, as well as the skirt. By doing that, water will drip off and not blow back onto the sill/slab where it could cause a leak.

Don't caulk the gap where the starter strip and siding meet the drip cap. Allow for a 1/8-1/4" gap below the siding there for drainage.
 
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Old 10-13-06, 08:32 AM
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My problem is this: the outside edge of the sill plate is recessed about 2-3 inches from the edge of the slab. Is it safe to have the exposed edge of the sheathing 1/16 - 1/8 above the slab which MAY become wet?

Is there a way to totally block out water, or is the fact that the sheathing is not touching the slab enough?

Thanks...
 
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Old 10-13-06, 10:54 AM
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Wow. Sounds like some bad planning there.

Without seeing the situation, it sounds like you need to have some sort of custom flashing made for that area. You would keep the sheathing up off the cement, and then have a flashing made (That would look like an L that has an additional downward bend on the front of it) that would cover the top of the slab. Depending on how it would work with your skirt and siding, it would be a good idea to have some slope on that flashing so that it will drain- so water doesn't sit on it.

Anyone you know of that has a metal break could bend this flashing for you out of aluminum trim coil (comes in any color you want). You would install the flashing first on top of your sheathing, then tarpaper, then skirt, then slit, then stick the dripcap into the slit.
 
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Old 10-13-06, 11:00 AM
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Thanks...

Bad planning is right. The previous owner really made a mess...
 
 

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