to resheet exterior or not

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Old 02-23-07, 05:22 PM
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to resheet exterior or not

i bought a house that was built in 1999.the exterior walls are sheeted with a board called energy-brace which is basicaly foil coated cardboard about 3/8" thick and vinyl siding attached directly to it.we had a wicked wind storm and some of the vinyl pulled loose.iwent up on the ladder to fix it and also saw that the energy brace was also pulling loose or was never put on properly in the first place i can see the insulation behind it so you have energybrace then vinyl attached to it nothing else. the problem with the energybrace and the vinyl is you can only nail the vinyl on the studs nowhere else which gives limited nailing areas.i was also concerned there is no house wrap ,which leaves nothing between the insulation and thevinyl but energybrace which has lots of gaps where they meet the studs1/4"to1/2" do i just house wrap and reside the house or do i resheet the exterior with 1/2" osb over energybrace then housewrap then vinyl. i just cant believe this is all there is on the wall for exterior sheeting
 
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Old 02-23-07, 07:49 PM
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Some of the practices commonly used in the building trade are questionable to say the least. Maybe unwise would be a better term for it. Regardless, you have a couple options. The first and easiest option would be the one I mentioned in your previous post.

Taping the seams on your Energy Brace. To do this, you'd need to remove all your vinyl siding. If you tape all the seams, it will most importantly make your sheathing- the Energy Brace- a weather resistive barrier, bringing it up to current building standards.

Adding Tyvek over the top of the Energy Brace would basically accomplish the same purpose (creating a weather resistive barrier) provided all Tyvek seams are taped. Doing both would be at least partially redundant, so you would choose one or the other.

Adding plywood or OSB over the energy brace creates some problems around windows and doors that you would need to consider. Windows and doors usually have nailing flanges, which are the means by which the window/door is mounted on top of the weather resistive barrier- your taped sheathing. If you add plywood or OSB on TOP of your existing, you will be covering up all the nailing flanges which creates at least 3 problems.

1). your windows/doors are no longer mounted on top of the primary weather resistive barrier, which can lead to leaks. The perimeter of these openings is difficult to seal. Caulking is often used to do this, which is not the world's best method of flashing.

2). it makes the windows and doors difficult (but not impossible) to remove in the future, because you've covered up the means to remove them.

3). if you build the sheathing out, the window trim must be removed and when it is replaced, it is also moved father out, which makes a wider ledge where the bottom trim could potentially catch water and funnel it behind the siding.

It's certainly possible for you to install additional sheathing on top of your existing... but if you do you'd want to address those 3 issues and have a plan for dealing with them. If you install additional sheathing you would definately need to install Tyvek or a similar housewrap over the top of the sheathing and then seal it to the windows as best as possible. Depending on the type of trim you plan to use around the windows and doors, a drip cap flashing above each one might also be advisable.

It's fairly common to see products like Energy brace, Thermax, Styrofoam, or in older homes blackjack and gypsum... used as sheathing. IMO, all these are a royal pain-in-the-neck when you want to have something to nail to (besides a stud). So I can see why you'd like to have something that seems more solid under your siding.
 
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Old 02-24-07, 06:29 AM
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"It's fairly common to see products like Energy brace, Thermax, Styrofoam, or in older homes blackjack and gypsum... used as sheathing. IMO, all these are a royal pain-in-the-neck when you want to have something to nail to (besides a stud). So I can see why you'd like to have something that seems more solid under your siding."

It is amazing.
A fully sheathed wall of plywood or OSB should be mandatory when it comes to adding vinyl siding.

It is imparitive with 10-12 ft panel's to nail to the center of the nailing slot & having to find stud's to do this each time is almost impossible,leading to a poorly fastened wall of siding....Hence loose vinyl siding panel's if not appropriately secured.
 
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Old 02-24-07, 11:17 AM
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I totally agree, mikehammer. Amazing is also a good word for it.
 
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Old 02-24-07, 01:21 PM
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thanks for all your responses guys, lots of good info sound like taping seams and resideing would be best method.any info on vinyl siding with a heavy duty nailing flange on itas my exisitng is very thin and flimsy. thanks in advance
 
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Old 02-25-07, 08:05 AM
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In terms of looking for a heavy re-inforced nailing flange & product gauge w a real deep color variety here is what i would recommend

>>>http://www.gentekinc.com/products.asp?z=8&m=2&l=1&d=67&mpg=1&pg=1&navproductid=1
 
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Old 03-13-07, 05:55 PM
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Clovacrom, I have the same problem you encountered. Coincidentally, I'm also in the Baltimore area with a Pulte home built in 1998. In renovating my master bathroom, I noticed water on the subfloor and discovered that the insulation on the exterior walls was soaking wet. I've cut holes in some of the other exterior walls around the house and all four sides of the house have wet insulation. A siding guy suggested that the problem is the lack of taped seams on the Energy Brace and no Tyvek, causing rain water that gets behind the siding to wick through the Energy Brace seams and into the insulation. He suggests taking down the siding, taping the seams, wrapping with Tyvek and re-siding. Oh, and I'll also need to take off the Energy Brace to let the insulation dry and tackle any mold or rotting from the wet insulation & framing. The explanation makes sense, but since he's a siding guy, I don't know how objective his opinion is. I'd hate to go through the expense only to find out that wasn't the problem. Does anyone have any thoughts? Clovacrom, have you had any luck with your house situation? Did Pulte hep you, or did they blow you off?
Thanks.
 
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Old 04-28-07, 05:14 PM
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bob what street do you live on? no help from pulte but i just fired off an email to the baltimore area service guy about a class action law suit just like the one that is going on in white marsh with ryland homes check your most recent booster paper
 
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