Rookie Puts Up Hardie, Needs Advice!


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Old 03-05-08, 10:17 PM
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Rookie Puts Up Hardie, Needs Advice!

Hello.

I've been reading this forum for a few weeks gathering whatever info I could on Hardie siding and finally decided to just ask my own questions. Here's my situation:

I have very little carpentry experience (I've put together a deck, installed shelves, all minor stuff) and recently bought a stick frame cabin in my town in AK and the first order of business is to put siding on it because right now it's just plywood. It's off the grid and a 4.5 hour drive from a hardware store, so I have to be well prepared with a proper list when I make my supply run. I decided to use hardie colorplus lap siding.

So, Questions:

1. Can I do this without a nailer? I have a good drill and all the time in the world, so I thought I'd pre-drill all the holes and hammer it up. Keep in mind that the cabin is 2.5 stories and I won't have scaffolding for this job; I'm borrowing a neighbors 32 ft ladder and using Solosiders (an adjustable siding assistant thingy).

2. I've bought a fibercement shear attachment for my drill, but I'm worried about finer cuts (around widows, namely). Do I need a jigsaw to do this job well? Or could I maybe be extra careful and use my reciprocating saw? Or could I cut it with a coping (hand)saw?

3. I'm getting the Hardie delivered from our local Mercantile (b/c he's one of the only guys with a big enough truck), but this is a newish sort of order for them. While the guy is very skilled and careful, I'm worried the 3 hours on a gravel road is going to destroy a lot of the planks. I read on another post about the fact that Hardie deliveries often have many broken. So, should I order much extra? How much?

4. Does Tyvek suck? Should I use roofing felt instead? Or any other suggestions...

And I might add more later. I'm very hungry for any general suggestions you guys might have. Thank you much for your time and knowledge.

Other random info about my situation: The cabin is 12X20. I have a 2000 watt generator and my only power tools are a drill, recip saw, and circular saw. I am definitely on a budget but care a ton about doing this right.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 04:24 AM
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Siding

If you feel comfortable doing plunge cuts, then you can do all the cuts with a circular saw. Otherwise, you may need a jig saw. I would not advise trying to cut this stuff with a reciprocating saw.

A word of caution. Check the James Hardie website for installation instructions. There ar two different nailing methods listed. One is nailing the top edge only. The other is nailing the bottom edge, which leaves nails exposed. Also, use a framing square to measure each of the angles on each end of the boards in the gables which follow the roof pitch. Measure each one. They will be slightly different. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 05:56 AM
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Just an add-on, no expert on Hardie, but I've loaded plenty of it. Its not so much the ride on the truck, you just need plenty of kickers under it for support. Its the loading and unloading. That stuff is so heavy it will bow down several feet at each end when you pick it up with a forklift. Slow and steady lifting and moving is the only way to win that race.

Will they give you credit for broken ones? Or take back what you don't need?
 
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Old 03-06-08, 11:08 AM
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Okay...

Wirepuller:

I think I'm okay with plunge cuts; though I'm not excited creating dust with this stuff, I suppose I won't need to do it a ton.

I have carefully read the directions on Jameshardie.com and plan on doing blind nailing.

Thanks for the heads up on the gables.

Gunguy:

Though I'm not 100 % sure, I'm pretty sure that there will only be a forklift used in the loading, in Anchorage. I don't think the Mercantile has one. And since this is a very specified order for them, I don't think they'll take back what I don't need, but on the other hand, he's a good honest guy and I don't think he'll charge me for planks broken on delivery.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 05:15 PM
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can't you just score and snap hardieplank?
 
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Old 03-06-08, 07:16 PM
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Scarywoody:

while I don't know for sure, I certainly haven't heard or read of anyone using that technique for hardie.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 11:02 PM
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"a. Best: i. Score and snap
ii. Shears (manual, electric or pneumatic)"

From the install guide itself.
http://www.jameshardie.com/pdf/insta...lank_north.pdf


Also a good link
http://www.jameshardiecolorplus.com/video_demos.cfm#
 
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Old 03-07-08, 04:29 AM
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Hardie Plank

It depends on whether you want a rough edge or a smooth edge.
 
 

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