What is this wood siding?

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Old 03-25-08, 08:16 PM
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What is this wood siding?

My small house and 2 outbuildings are sided with wooden planks that are about 9 inches wide. The edges have overlapping rabbets with the top (show) side beveled, so the joint makes a ‘V’. It appears to be face nailed. Hopefully my picture of an end of one will work so you can see it.

This isn’t quite tongue-and-groove “car siding”, but it isn’t traditional lap siding either. What name would I look for when shopping for repair stock?

Is there any version of it made in more durable materials like cement fiber?

Thanks!
-- Rich

 
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Old 03-26-08, 05:17 AM
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Different suppliers will have different names for it.

-The overlapping rabbet joints mean it is shiplap.
-The car siding-like v-grooves are an added feature.
-The size is likely 1x10

So some suppliers might call it 1x10 V-shiplap or V-rustic shiplap. (pattern no. 795).

See the following illustrations:
On page 9 of http://www.calredwood.org/ref/pdf/Patterns17.pdf
Or page 3 of http://www.kelleher.com/documents/Ad...e2-1-05Web.pdf
 
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Old 03-26-08, 07:49 AM
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Thank you, Xsleeper!

Do you know if the small cracks are reasonable to fill, sand, and paint? I'd like them to not get bigger, and not reappear next year. Is there a good product to use that will fill both fill and bond?

I'm hoping that since they are face nailed, those I need to replace should be fairly easy to get out.

-- Rich
 
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Old 03-26-08, 07:55 AM
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In 3D:

 
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Old 03-26-08, 08:21 AM
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I was reluctant to call mine "shiplap" because I thought shiplap always had the cove detail at the top joint (to shed water from the joint), but the V detail on mine will do the same job, so I guess it's just a varient.

-- Rich
 
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Old 03-26-08, 06:22 PM
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There are numerous styles of shiplap siding.

As far as your cracks are concerned, I'm afraid that you may have to deal with cracks every year. You can "hope" they don't get bigger or reappear, but since wood expands and contracts with temperature and humidity, I think your cracks will change throughout the year. You could fix some cracks now, and a few would likely reappear by summer. Fix them again, and some will reappear by fall... ect. Painter's caulk and touch-up paint may be the simplest, longest lasting solution, since the caulking can flex with changes in the weather. I'm not sure some type of hard filler (epoxy wood fillers, bondo, rock hard putty) are the answer in this case.

If the back side of the siding has not been primed and painted, I'd recommend that you do so. It will reduce the amount of moisture the wood is able to absorb from the air, and should reduce expansion and contraction, which is what leads to a lot of cracking.

Some of your cracking is probably due to improper nailing. Such a wide plank should not be nailed so close to the v-groove on the top and bottom edges. A plank that is 9" wide should not be nailed any closer than 2 1/4" from the top and bottom edge.
 
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Old 04-01-08, 08:23 AM
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For what it's worth, the lumber yards around here appear to call this style of siding (shiplap edges with a chamfer where the boards meet, forming a V groove when installed) "vee rustic". I was concerned that the "rustic" part would imply a rough surface, but it does not.

Broadly, the 1x10 size we have is available in unfinished solid redwood, ceader, and primed finger-jointed pine.

The redwood installed in the 60's at our place is pretty shot, almost crumbly, at least on the south and west walls. The north and east walls are much better.

I'm going to try the pine version. I'll prime the cut ends, pre-drill the nail holes, and keep it painted, so hopefully it'll last well.

Is there a special "right" way to nail this? I've not used siding that is face nailed before. I've started with 8p hot-dipped box nails, driven flush. Should I use another fastener? Anything special to use to go over the nail heads before final painting?

-- Rich
 
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Old 04-01-08, 08:34 AM
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Oh yeah, I forgot: is this installed with a gap for expansion/contraction?

-- Rich
 
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Old 04-01-08, 10:36 AM
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Priming and painting all sides (including cut ends) of the siding will result in the longest lasting paint job and will likely also help reduce cracking due to expansion and contraction.

8d nails are a little big IMO, 7d would be sufficient. The larger the nail the more chance it will split around the nail. You mentioned predrilling, which is a good idea- probably not something a contractor would do unless it was his own house, so it's a wise precaution that's worth the time it takes. Hot dipped galvanized will work fine. Driving them flush is also fine- just try not to put elephant tracks on the wood as you drive them flush. You have to be careful to avoid denting the wood.

As far as contact is concerned, since you have v-groove, you don't want a big space between the v's. The term I'd use for the spacing is "moderate contact". This means you can pretty much just stack them up and forget about any spacing. You'll have a slight space between them since you won't be pressing them tightly together like a wood floor or something.

As I mentioned, if the pieces are 9" wide, the pairs of nails should be placed roughly 2 1/4" from the top and bottom edges. (1/4 of panel width) Nailing too close to the top and bottom also increases the likelihood of splitting.

You'll want to take the time to prime the nail heads prior to finish painting.
 
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Old 04-01-08, 01:24 PM
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THANK YOU!

I think I'll go with the 7d nails, and I've already made a template for the nail spacing, per your earlier recommendation.

Do you fill around the nails before paint? Have a favorite product to use?

-- Rich
 
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Old 04-01-08, 01:39 PM
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I would just paint over them. But I'm not a professional painter!

So I'll defer the painting questions to Marksr... if you wanted his opinion. I'm guessing he'll say that he wipes them with "white lightning" latex painter's caulk before priming/painting.
 
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