Painting face-nailed siding

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Old 04-02-08, 03:49 PM
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Painting face-nailed siding

XSleeper says marksr will give the low-down on this.

Now that I'm putting on new wood siding (1x10 shiplap with a bevel), what do I do about those pesky nails ruining that nice smooth surface? I've been driving them just even with the surface. I'm hesitant to set them deeper lest I crack the wood, but I'd like to blend them as much as possible. Is there a good fill product that will handle the weather well with a very thin application, and either go on very smooth or sand easily?

-- Rich
 
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Old 04-03-08, 04:09 AM
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It's always been my understanding that it was best to not countersink nails on the siding. On masonite or other moisture sensitive sidings, I've always filled sunk nails with caulk leveling it with my putty knife - quick and easy

You can also use exterior grade spackling or window glazing - both need to primed. Glazing may discolor if not primed well. Durhams rock hard putty can also be used but it is almost impossible to sand

IMO caulking will adhere the best. There is always a possiblity that fillers can come loose. Personally I've never considered the nails unsightly providing they are snug. 1 coat of primer and 2 coats of latex paint will help to make them less noticable.
 
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Old 04-03-08, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
IMO caulking will adhere the best.
Sadly I seem to lack the magic touch to apply a thin and flat layer of caulk without leaving little creases. Maybe I'm using too much...

Thanks!
-- Rich
 
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Old 04-03-08, 08:30 AM
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Take note of marksr's last paragraph. He's right on the mark here. DIYer's are their own worst enemy, wanting to make their jobs "picture perfect"... when in fact, after the painting is done - your job will look as good as anything a pro could/would have done.

Reminds me of my last flooring project. Laid new hardwood floor by recycling an old one. When it was initially finished, we (wife/me) found all sorts of "problems" with the finish (too much poly in spots, nail hole putty showing, knot in a visible spot, etc)... but last night, after a few weeks in place - she said (damn, this floor looks great!!)
 
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Old 04-03-08, 01:03 PM
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If you knife off caulk over a hole it will mostly likely shrink a little. Carefull use of the putty knife will remove all the caulk not left in the hole.

Another trick when using caulk is to keep a damp rag or sponge to wipe off any excess - it also helps to keep your fingers clean
 
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