Exterior Cedar Siding Repair


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Old 04-21-08, 11:43 AM
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Lightbulb Exterior Cedar Siding Repair

I'm stumped about the best way to go about repairing the bottom of an exterior window frame. Water from the roof has rotted the cedar siding and base of the window frame to the extent that the glass window has actually begun to slide down into the rotted frame - leaving a 1" opening at the top! Welcome in bugs! My husband thinks we need to dismantle the entire window, but I'm wondering if we can just remove the lower framing that is damaged and somehow lift the window back up into place. Any ideas about how feasible this would be and how to hold the window up into place while inserting the new bottom frame?
 
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Old 04-21-08, 04:41 PM
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My specialty is painting but I've replaced sections of window sills [rotten] prior to painting. It is just a matter of cutting out the bad and inserting new wood. You will need to remove the rot and see just what you have - you can't very well install a new sill if the wood supporting it is rotten too.
 
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Old 04-21-08, 08:23 PM
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If I understand you correctly, you are describing a window sash that has a rotton bottom rail, which is allowing the glass to sink down into the rotton rail.

In most cases, if this is occurring, the sash is pretty far gone, and replacement and repair of the rotton wood would be cost prohibitive. If the sash is not too far gone, one could remove the old glazing, glazing points and glass, fill with bondo, sand, reapply, sand more, etc... until the wood has been returned to it's former shape. The reinstall and reglaze the sash.

Another option would involve having a new custom sash made. this would also likely be cost prohibitive.

Or perhaps you are referring to the entire window sash, frame, glass, and all... that is slipping down into a rotton sloped window sill? If so, replacing the sill is certainly possible, but it's a trick. I'd like to say it's easier said than done, but in this case I think it's easier to do than it is to EXPLAIN how to do it. Suffice to say that you need to fabricate a sill that is the same shape and size as the existing one, and just swap them out. There, that was easy! LOL
 
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Old 04-23-08, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
If I understand you correctly, you are describing a window sash that has a rotton bottom rail, which is allowing the glass to sink down into the rotton rail.

In most cases, if this is occurring, the sash is pretty far gone, and replacement and repair of the rotton wood would be cost prohibitive. If the sash is not too far gone, one could remove the old glazing, glazing points and glass, fill with bondo, sand, reapply, sand more, etc... until the wood has been returned to it's former shape. The reinstall and reglaze the sash.

Another option would involve having a new custom sash made. this would also likely be cost prohibitive.

Or perhaps you are referring to the entire window sash, frame, glass, and all... that is slipping down into a rotton sloped window sill? If so, replacing the sill is certainly possible, but it's a trick. I'd like to say it's easier said than done, but in this case I think it's easier to do than it is to EXPLAIN how to do it. Suffice to say that you need to fabricate a sill that is the same shape and size as the existing one, and just swap them out. There, that was easy! LOL

Yes, the window glass itself has sunk down into the rotten wood beneath it! The window itself is a solid plate - actually a sidelight to the sliding glass door next to it. So it's just slid down into the top of the softened wood beneath it. Apparently the guy who re-roofed our house positioned the water deflector on the roof over the window and sliding glass door incorrectly so that rain runoff was running right down the side of the window and rotting the wood! It was too far gone before we realized what happened. So, it sounds like we need to try to fabricate a new sill the same size/shape as the rotten one, remove the rotten one and put the new one in. I still am not sure how to keep the window glass from sliding down in the process but was thinking I need a piece of ply or something to wedge it up. What would you do?
Thanks
 

Last edited by DIYNan; 04-23-08 at 10:22 AM. Reason: Forgot to mention important fact about the window itself
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Old 04-23-08, 10:52 AM
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I'd probably remove the glass and put some plywood over the opening to close it up temporarily. Or if the sash (your sidelight) that the glass sits in is removable, I'd remove the whole thing in order to work on it. Hard to say without seeing how it's put together.

I was once sent to fix a similar problem on the sidelight of an older wood exterior door from the late 70's, (darn soft wood nowadays!) and ended up just making a new bottom rail. I don't recall how I got the glass back up but I probably used our glass suction cups, put one on each side, and then just lifted it up. I'm guessing it there was enough friction that it stayed put while I replaced the rotton rail below. I may have removed the exterior stop around the glass, and removed the glass entirely, however. Those stops are also usually in need of being replaced- they actually can catch and hold water, speeding up the rotting process. New stops and new exterior glazing might be a good idea if your sidelight is similar to the one I'm thinking of.
 
 

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