Pressure washing methods for wood siding?

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Old 05-15-08, 06:50 AM
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Pressure washing methods for wood siding?

What's the best way to pressure wash this type of siding:

http://www.katanapg.com/picture/67368

Give me an idea of what I need to do to get it ready for re-staining, and what I should do to just clean it off (hopefully) without having to re-stain.

I've pressure treated cedar siding before (which I think is pretty similar in surface texture to this), but all I used was straight tap water, no detergents/additives, and the results weren't what I was hoping for. It wasn't bad, especially since it hasn't been properly cleaned or re-treated in the last 10 years or so, but I'm thinking there has to be something the pros do or use that I don't know about (since I don't know that much in this area ).

What sort of additives could make a significant difference?

Cold vs. Hot water pressure washing?

Any input would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Jeffrey
 
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Old 05-15-08, 11:14 AM
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While a pressure washer can be a great aid in cleaning siding, it shouldn't be the sole method. I generally wet the siding down and then use a pump up sprayer to apply the cleaning solution, let it set but not dry and then use the pressure washer to rinse it off. It can be rinsed off with a water hose if you don't have access to a pressure washer.

T-111 is basically a plywood with a rough grain veneer. Most if not all manufactures recomend using paint not stain. Because it's plywood it needs the extra protection that paint gives.

Spraying a bleach/water solution should clean up the siding but it will really benifit from a fresh coat of paint. Adding an extra mildewcide to the paint may help it to stay looking nice for a longer period.
 
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Old 05-15-08, 01:06 PM
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Thanks for the pointers. I don't like using a pressure washer on wood siding simply because it can damage the surface of the wood. So using it as the "rinse cycle" instead of the "wash cycle" would be a big plus in my opinion.

Any recommendations on cleaning solutions other than bleach/water combos? There are a lot of plants and such that wouldn't react too well to bleach. I can cover them up and spray them down afterwards, but I'd still prefer not to use bleach if I can help it.

Thanks again,
Jeffrey
 
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Old 05-15-08, 03:55 PM
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You can use one of the deck cleaners.
I've always used bleach because it's cheap and effective. Plant damage can be kept to a minimum by keeping it wet - before, during and after - this usually keeps any bleach solution deluted enough so as not to harm the plants. Plastic also works well although care must be taken to not "cook" the plants if covered up in the hot sun.
 
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Old 05-16-08, 06:09 AM
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In your experience, have you seen much T-111 stained? I'm more of a carpenter, not a painter, so just by looking at this siding, I can't say for sure if it was painted or stained originally. I can see more wood than I think I should be able to if it was painted, but nothing seems to be flaking off, so my best guess is that it was stained originally.

If I was to paint this, would I need to prime it first? If so, and assuming it was stained, what kind of primer/top coat would be ideal?

If you hand me a brush/roller/sprayer, and some paint, and say "paint that" I'm good to go. I'm not as fast as professional painters, but I'm not slow, and I'm not sloppy either. On the other hand, if you hand me a brush/roller/sprayer, and an assortment of different types of paints and say "pick one," I most likely won't know which to pick.

I just need to find an experienced painter that I can put on speed dial that doesn't mind being bothered all the time.

Again, thanks for all the help!
Jeffrey
 
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Old 05-16-08, 07:28 AM
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" just need to find an experienced painter that I can put on speed dial that doesn't mind being bothered all the time "

Yikes

T-111 does get stained fairly often with solid latex stain and occasionally with a semi-transparent stain, they just don't give the plywood as much protection as paint = possible shorter life span.

T-111 comes in both pine and cedar. The pic looked like you have either paint or solid stain. Generally you shouldn't have any problems painting over the solid stain. The main exception would be if you go a light color over cedar as it might cause issues with tannin bleed..... but if it isn't present now, it probably won't be an issue.

I like to use an 1.5" roller cover when painting T-111. Basically you slop the paint on letting it run into all the cracks and the grooves and then after it sets for a minute or two, go back over it with the dry roller to wipe out the runs and make it look nice. This is a lot easier/quicker than using a shorter nap and brushing the grooves and rolling the rest. Even if you spray, the siding should be back rolled [or brushed] to work the paint into the siding.
 
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Old 05-22-08, 08:23 AM
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"Yikes

I don't know about TN, but in SC that would be the sound someone would make when they were eager to volunteer for something. Are you, *cough* volunteering, *cough*?

1.5" roller cover? I don't think I've ever even seen something like that... would that be the "nap," if so, I'm guessing the time you saved in prep-work (i.e. taping/covering windows, etc.), and the obvious unnecessary back brushing/rolling, would make it much less of a hassle than spraying.

What about types of paint? If you were painting this, would you use an oil-based primer and topcoat? If the owner wanted a solid stain instead of paint, would you go with oil or latex?

From what I've read, paint products that are water clean-up have pretty much caught up with oil based products in most, if not all, applications. But, I want the best looking protection I can get... I'm just not too sure what that would be exactly.

Thanks for all your help, and sorry for asking so many picky questions, if it gets annoying, just tell me to "shut it." It won't hurt my feelings, I promise.

Thanks again,
Jeffrey
 
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Old 05-22-08, 10:12 AM
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Yes, 1.5" is reffering to the nap lenght of a 9" roller cover. An 1" or 1.25" nap may also do ok. A good roller cover [I always buy mine at a paint store] holds and releases paint well so it isn't as messy as you might think.

Use a quality latex house paint. You may not need a primer but a lot depends on the condition of the current paint/stain and the color to be used.

If using a solid stain, it would be best to continue with the same type [oil or latex] but if unable to determine, there shouldn't be any problems with repainting with a solid latex stain.

As stated before, paint will give more protection than solid stain [thicker film] Stains generally require less prep when repainting because a stain seldom peels but between the rough texture of the T-111 and use of a quality paint - there shouldn't be any peeling issues when it comes time to repaint.
 
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Old 05-22-08, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeffrew View Post
"Yikes

I don't know about TN, but in SC that would be the sound someone would make when they were eager to volunteer for something. Are you, *cough* volunteering, *cough*?
I thought that was the sound of someone that had went too far east in SC ,made when they realized they had left the pretty hills and found thereselves in flat sandy land
 
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Old 05-23-08, 11:49 AM
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Ha ha, you're right, we say "yikes" when we leave the rolling hills and suddenly find ourselves in the flat, sandy lowlands where the roads go on forever in a straight line.

I can't say thanks enough for the tips and advice. You should be getting paid for this.

Cheers,
~Jeffrey
 
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