Trim Coil Question

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Old 08-06-08, 05:45 PM
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Trim Coil Question

Hello:

My husband and I purchased a fixer upper and are learning as we go along. I have convinced my husband to redo our soffits using vinyl. I think we are set as far as that process is concerned, however, I have learned that we should use aluminum trim coil for the facsia. My question is, is there a simple brake to use for this purpose (hand-held?), or is it necessary to rent a large brake? If so, what is the standard size we should rent (I am assuming the break has a limit as far as the length)? Also, is this a project for a DIY'er?

Thank you in advance.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 06:14 PM
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If your soffits are very wide, I'd recommend you go with aluminum soffit over vinyl soffit. Vinyl is not really any easier to work with. In fact, in addition to being more stiff, I like that you can staple the aluminum soffit to the wood, rather than nail upside down, as you do with vinyl. But if your soffits are narrow, vinyl will work too. I just don't understand why anyone prefers vinyl over aluminum. Maybe someday someone will enlighten me.

If you are doing your fascia, I'd recommend you use the prebent aluminum fascia cover (comes in 4", 6", 8") since it almost completely eliminates the need for a metal break. You may have some areas where you need wide coil, but you can often cut up some 8" fascia and make that work instead.

There is a hand held seamer (like the ones made by Malco) that will work for bending 1" flaps where needed (inside and outside fascia corners). But it is not the sort of thing you would use to bend profiles. Only a long metal break will do that. Most of the breaks you rent are 10'6" and do not work well with the prebent fascia cover since that stuff is 12' long. If you use a metal break, you usually bend all the metal from aluminum trim coil. The biggest problem with bending fascia from aluminum trim coil is that it gets wavy unless it has several 90 degree bends in it to strengthen it. Often, you have to use a combination of prebent fascia and some custom bent aluminum trim coil to cover a few areas that need covered.

It's definately a DIY'er project, provided you aren't desiring perfection on your first attempt at this. Professionals will do a better job if that's your goal. Even they aren't "perfect".
 
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Old 08-07-08, 01:54 PM
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Thank you for the detailed response XSleeper. I am not sure about the aluminum/vinyl debate either. I see through research online, people generally prefer vinyl everything, with the exception of the trim.

We did purchase a 6"x10' piece of fascia from Lowe's, however, it is "ribbed"-which I have never seen installed and question if it would look as good as the smooth fascia (neither Lowe's or Home Depot had smooth aluminum fascia). Do you have an opinion as to how the ribbed fascia looks installed? If I were to purchase the pre-bent smooth fascia, would I need to go to a lumberyard, or is it something I can purchase online? And, lastly, for the rake, would I use the ribbed fascia, as well, and just trim it down to size, or would you recommend using trim coil and the hand held brake.

Thank you in advance for your help.
 
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Old 08-07-08, 04:49 PM
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The "rib" is in there to give the fascia cover some rigidity. It reduces wrinkles in the fascia, which is a good thing. It will still wrinkle if installed poorly, since fascia wrinkles when it is pushed up too tight on a surface that is not perfectly straight.

I wouldn't hesitate to use the ribbed everywhere you possibly can.

On the gable ends, I'm not sure what you are seeing that would necessitate the use of trim coil and a break... unless maybe you have a wood fascia that has a 1x2 trim next to the shingles.

And like I said, the hand held seamer is for making small bends around corners... as in a 6" wide 1" bend on the end of a 6" piece of fascia cover. (not a 12' long bend that is 1" wide). If you are going to bend any aluminum trim coil you'll need to rent a BIG metal break... most are 10' 6" long.
 
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Old 08-07-08, 06:40 PM
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Maybe I used term "rake" incorrectly. I am referring to the ends of the fascia that form a triangle.

Thank you for the advice. I now feel confident in the ribbed fascia, which I was beginning to question.
 
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Old 08-08-08, 04:44 AM
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On those triangle shaped corners, you may have to layer several pieces in order to cover the entire height of the triangle shaped corner. If a single piece of fascia is not tall enough to cover, take a utility knife and score the back inside corner on a short piece of fascia cover. (a sharp blade works best). Then you can bend that bottom lip back and forth until it breaks off. You get a much cleaner cut this way, as opposed to trimming with a tin snips. Then you can take that flat, ribbed piece of metal and layer it over the top of the first one. I often will run a strip of silicone behind such a piece to ensure the nails never work loose. (but don't let the silicone gush out or it will look bad!)
 
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Old 08-08-08, 08:09 AM
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Thank you so much for the excellent advice!
 
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