T1-11


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Old 12-24-08, 06:55 PM
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T1-11

Can anyone give me a definitive answer on what T1-11 plywood is, and who makes it, and its rating as siding/sheathing? At lumberyards what they call t1-11 does not say that on the product label, and it the word seems to mean any rough-sawn plywood that's rated exterior. Even searching on T1-11 and Georgia-Pacific turns up only one brochure that only uses the term in a sidebar with no details: (http://www.gp.com/BUILD/DocumentView...elementid=7051).
 
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Old 12-24-08, 09:11 PM
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T1-11 is an exterior siding profile (which roughly means 1" inset groove, 11" panel, repeated across a 4' wide sheet), not a specific brand, type, or thickness of material. If the manufacturer of a specific T1-11 product is an APA member, it will carry an APA stamp on the back with information regarding it's structural rating. If there is no stamp, then you would probably have to contact the manufacturer for that information, if your lumber yard can't provide it for you.
 
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Old 12-24-08, 09:50 PM
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Talking

I'm not sure why you asked what is the "rating", exterior is just that. I'm a contractor and this is a interesting question! I can give you some history on how it came about. Old days "when plywood was coming out" Placing Ext plywood on ext studs was a cheap way for barns.ect. Now the problem, vertical sheeting seam every 4'. To cover that was a 1by strips and that was called a "bat" So old days was do it in "bat and board" I guess after awhile it so so to eye. So lets add a "bat" in middle of the ply like the seamed 4' O.C. brake it up look batter (pun) Early on bat /boards were painted. As time went on sealer stains were coming out. The didn't suck into ply real good. So out ruff comes texture "open fiber", sealer sucked in much better. Manuf. thinks hay add more of the strip look and save mat. weight to ship. Out sell the old ply sellers. So if we did the old 'batt" and evenly batted inlays on a 4' board there comes the 11" strips between the now inlayed 'batts" ( 1 11 ) So whats the "T" I can't answer all of your questions. If its rated EXT and a APA spec then thats what it is. Engineered ply and better quality than old loose compacted fibered . Heres my guess. The 'T' was the orginal look on top of verticial batts on old ply. The old batt was horzintal to cover gaps in installation aganist soffits The 1 on the T was batt against And 1 11 was the first "bat" on the first seam and the 11 was the next two "bats" to complete a ply panel. Or it wonderfully connected to present day 1" is the space like an old bat and evenly spaced you had 11 between raised panel on todays board. I'm just taking and educated guess. Contractor since 79 I hope at best this was enjoyable to read. part is true the "T" was a guess. Don't over worry, ext the cheap or the not so cheap. Sometimes I think the homeowner gets to scientific nowadays. Its one of theses I want the best for the least which is fine. Part of the computer Information access nut over thinking. were not building a rockets with it.
Good Luck with your project. I will keep my eye on this one Grads on an interesting post!!
Happy Holidays!!!
Signed 21 Boat!
 

Last edited by 21boat; 12-24-08 at 10:23 PM.
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Old 12-25-08, 08:33 AM
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I thought there was an exposure rating (e.g. Exterior or Exposure 1) and a structural rating (e.g., Rated Siding or Rated Sheathing), and these both come from APA. Do you know the ratings for T1-11 and why it's not on the label?

Thanks for the history, 21boat. My house is sided with plywood sheets with vertical "battens" (vertical 1x3 cedar) installed 16" at studs. This closes the seams and gives a real nice board and batten look and I want the NG type (no groove). The sheathing is the siding.

I'm enclosing a separate carport and want the same look. Of course, in South Florida there are code questions.
 
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Old 12-25-08, 12:54 PM
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T111 is plywood/hardboard panels. I don't think there are different grades of it, so there's no reason to stamp anything else on it.

Normal plywood has ratings, i.e. Exterior AC/BC rated, exp 1, etc.
 
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Old 12-25-08, 07:20 PM
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HotinOKC: See previous - T1-11 is not stamped on it, and previous replies suggest T1-11 is not rated. If you're right that T1-11 is it's own type of plywood that doesn't need ratings, how do I tell what it is if it's not on the APA stamp, and whether it's suitable for a particular purpose? Exterior is stamped on it, but that's an exposure rating, not structural (as near as I can tell).

The main question is, are these products structurally rated for siding and/or sheathing on buildings? If yes, where is the information? If a rating is not on the stamp, does that mean it's not rated?

To XSLEEPER: The lumber yard I'm dealing with has 3 versions of what they call T1-11. Two are grooved at difference widths (one may be 11", the other has closer grooves, like 8"). The third type is NG (no groove).
 
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Old 12-26-08, 04:56 AM
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5/8" thick T-111 is normally used in place of sheating and should meet code in most locales. There is also a 3/8" thick T-111 that is mostly used for sheds - may or may not meet code.

It was always my understanding that 1" [+/-] groove with 11" panel was called RB&B - reverse board and batten and that the exterior plywood with either 4" or 8" 'panels' with a smaller groove was called T-111.
 
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Old 12-26-08, 11:30 AM
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Here's what it says on the panel:

TECO TESTED
PS1-95
EXTERIOR
SPECIALTY SIDING
6 WOOD PATCHES
24 INCH O.C.
19/32 INCH 15 mm
HUD UM 64
SPECIES GROUP 1
 
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Old 12-26-08, 03:38 PM
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It is basically 5/8" thick and is rated for stud spacing as wide as 24" on center.
 
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Old 12-26-08, 04:36 PM
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Here's the final word from APA. Although they can't speak specifically to the label I posted (not APA), most of the questions are answered except how it all relates to the label I posted. Note the explanation of T1-11 in the last paragraph:


APA Rated Sheathing is a Performance Rated Panel designed and manufactured specifically for residential and other light frame wall sheathing, roof sheathing and subflooring applications. APA Rated Sheathing with an Exposure 1 exposure durability rating is not appropriate for permanent exposure to the elements. In wall applications, Rated Sheathing Exposure 1 is protected by an additional layer of cladding such as lap or panel siding, brick, stucco, etc.

APA Rated Siding is a grade designation covering APA proprietary siding products. Can be manufactured as conventional veneered plywood, as a composite, or as oriented strand board siding. Available with special surface treatments such as V-groove, channel groove, deep groove, brushed, rough sawn, and texture embossed (MDO). APA Rated Siding bearing a Span Rating of 24 oc in the trademark can be applied vertically direct to studs spaced 24 inches on center. Siding with a Span Rating of 16 oc can be used vertically direct to studs 16 inches on center.

2007 Florida Building Code accepts APA 303 Plywood Siding without additional product approval. Reference Chapter 23 of the code for application requirements. Section 2314.4 stipulates reference standards adopted by the code. Section 2314.4.3: APA The Engineered Wood Association. Included (among other APA references) is 1. APA Design Construction Guide, Residential and Commercial (now named APA Engineered Wood Construction Guide), 10. Performance Standards and Policies for Structural-Use Panels: PRP-108. and 11. 303 Siding Manufacturing Specification: B840. These standards are also listed in Chapter 35: Reference Standards. Table 2308.9.3(2) Exposed Plywood Siding stipulates minimum panel thickness, measured at bottom of grooves. For siding applied direct to studs spaced 16 inches on center the minimum thickness is 3/8-inch. For siding applied direct to studs spaced 24 inches on center the minimum thickness is 1/2-inch. 2007 Florida Building Code Residential, Table R703.3.4(1) and Table R703.3.4(2) provide wood structural panel minimum thickness requirements for Exposure Category B and Exposure Category C respectively.

TEXTURE 1-11 or T1-11, is a registered trade name for a special APA 303 Rated Siding Panel produced in accordance with 303 Siding Manufacturing Specification as referenced in 2007 Florida Building Code Section 2314.4.3. T1-11 is available in 19/32" or 5/8" thickness with parallel grooves 1/4" deep, 3/8" wide; grooves 4" or 8" o.c. are standard.
 
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Old 12-27-08, 02:51 PM
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Huh, you are right, Marksr... around here we have always referred to RB&B (12" OC) as being t1-11, which isn't really correct, according to the APA definition above! You hardly see any of the 4" or 8" OC t1-11 siding at all in these parts, it isn't kept in stock anywhere like the RB&B is, and if you need to order some, you order 4" OC 303 (plywood) siding! Because if you just say t1-11, most people in these parts think of RB&B!

Guess I need to start calling RB&B by its proper name!
 
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Old 12-27-08, 02:56 PM
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But if you call it by it's proper name Sleeper, no one you work with will know WTH yer talking about, and if you try to explain, they'll think yer an A$$...lol
 
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Old 12-27-08, 03:14 PM
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ha ha, well they probably already think that about me.
 
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Old 12-27-08, 04:28 PM
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It's funny how the same item can be called by different names in different regions. When I worked in fla, everyone knew what visquene was [even if we couldn't spell it]when I moved to tenn, nobody knew what it was, said you couldn't buy it here but when explained - you can get all kinds of rolls of 'plastic' in different widths and mills thickness

Here most any lumber yard should have T-111 in stock but you might better call first if you need RB&B
 
 

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