Installing hardi...easy question!


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Old 03-09-09, 10:30 PM
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Installing hardi...easy question!

I have a 'bump-out' on my second story--think bay window, but 3' deep and 15' wide.

We're going to hardiplank it, but what do I do where it meets the brick of the rest of the house?

I think I've figured out the windows, but since the 'brick molding' is pretty shallow there--in some cases the current sheet siding is actually 1/4" OVER the trim, that may need some help too.

While we're at it, inside corners where its hardi/hardi?

so, to sum:
inside corners, hardi/brick
inside corners, hardi/hardi
beefing up window trim

and if you want to throw in any flashing or nailing suggestions, I'll take that too!!!

tim
 
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Old 03-10-09, 06:05 AM
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Not sure why your siding would be built out past the trim... but that should never be the case. Your trim should probably all be removed and shimmed out at least 3/4" farther... or replaced with something that is 3/4" thicker. Either that, or your existing siding should all be torn off so that your new siding doesn't stick out so far past the windows.

Where siding meets brick, I will usually install a vertical trim, treating it just like the edge of a window. Same with an inside corner, except the piece in an inside corner is usually square. 1x1 or 2x2, etc.

I avoid the cement trim because I don't like to cut it or nail it. So I'll either use PVC trim, or Miratec.

Keep your siding 2" away from any sidewalk, steps, or roof... anywhere water will splash up on it. And keep it 6" from the ground. If you have to install some trim to keep it 2" away, do it, and then put a drip cap on top of the trim, and maintain a 1/4" gap between your first row of siding and the flashing. Caulk the ends of the drip cap flashing prior to installing the siding, and then do not caulk the 1/4" gap.

When nailing, you should always try to find and hit the studs, although they do permit you to nail to a minimum of 7/16" sheathing if you nail 12" oc. Your nails need to be about 3/4" down from the top edge. James hardie has good instructions on their website that are a good guide to go by.
 
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Old 03-10-09, 10:49 PM
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i think...

...i understand.

but on the roof--if i put a piece of 2x2 pvc trim, does it still need a drip cap? and didnt i just raise the roof level two inches, so its still going to splash on the hardi?

i'm thinking i may need to re-case the windows...i'm going to try to use pvc, because i dont want to break (brake?) aluminum

i had read the hardie instructions, but i didnt feel comfortable with the windows and brick questions--really not addressed there. or i didnt see it

...i would hate to do 12" oc, and i don't know that 7/16" is under the paneling thats there--wouldnt that be standard?

...and every 12"...thats a lot of nails! roofing nailgun?

how long can i have it hanging before i paint it? i think i may be able to do a section at a time, and it would take me about two weeks to get it all up, trimmed, caulked, and then to come back and paint it all at once...somebody said paint it on the ground, then touch up anything you damage--thoughts on that?

thanks for the great answer btw--huge help. i might head over to the wood floor forum next
 
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Old 03-11-09, 06:30 PM
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For horizontal trim, I usually use a 1x2 or 1x4, and put a 3/4 drip edge over it. (Figure 7 in their instructions) I actually combine the ideas in figure 7 and figure 8 and install a 1x2 or 1x4 along roof lines to keep the siding even higher off the surface of the roof.

You mention you are going over "paneling that's already there". What's currently on the house?

When nailing 12" OC, you use 25% more fasteners than nailing 16" OC. I have used a roofing gun before, yes... but the heads are so large you have to be VERY careful not to nail too low. Roofing nailers also sometimes will not drive nails perfectly straight. I now have nailers specifically for fiber cement.

If you are using the primed hardiplank, James Hardie recommends a maximum of 6 months to paint it, if you use unprimed, 3 months. My folks painted all their fiber cement as they installed it. Mom painted a few while Dad and I installed. She always managed to stay 1 day ahead of us. Since you have to lay them out to dry you need a pretty big area to paint. Plus you can't stack them too soon, or the pieces will stick together. You have to keep them separated. A roll of newsprint works well to roll out and protect the pieces, if you can buy small end rolls from your local newspaper. Touch up painting is easy... or you can give the whole house a 2nd coat once it's installed.
 
 

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