Asbestos removal tips


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Old 03-26-09, 07:32 PM
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Asbestos removal tips

I have a very small home built in the 1950's. Under the current aluminum siding is 1200 ft-square of the home's original hard asbestos siding sheets. I received an estimate from a professional to have it removed for $1200. Unfortunately, I cannot afford this.

I checked with the landfill and they take it for $90 a ton. I am planning to line the perimeter of my home with tarps, purchase gloves and protective clothing, and some kind of mask, and maybe goggles. I will probably be able to remove for about $200 in supplies, and supposedly, these sheets of siding are almost like slate and do not crumble. Ultimately, I think it is in my best interest to remove myself if I take the proper precautions.

Also, I am wondering if wetting the asbestos is helpful to keep fibers in tact.

Any advice or equipment recommendations would be appreciated.

Thanks
 
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Old 03-27-09, 02:55 AM
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Here's some additional information for you.

How To Remove Asbestos Siding | How To Do Things.com
 
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Old 03-27-09, 04:25 AM
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I have to ask; is there some reason why you are removing it? That is, are you replacing it anyway or are you just doing it to get rid of the asbestos. If it's strictly for asbestos removal, you might want to do some reading on the subject. I think the asbestos is generally only hazardous if it is crumbling or otherwise unstable and would be considerably less of a hazard if you just left it in place. Once you start tearing it off you are certainly going to make it hazardous.
 
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Old 03-27-09, 04:40 AM
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Hi db, I used to install that stuff years ago, but won't go near it now. Siding is probably the least dangerous, but removing it WILL cause it to break and this is not a good DIY project. I here you on budgets, but $1,200 really isn't a bad price. Just to remove and clean up normal siding would cost you half of that, and they are removing two layers with one being asbestos. Of course they may be getting some extra cash for the recycled aluminum .

I would rather see you save by installing the new siding yourself and leave the asbestos to the pros. If you are in Philly you may not have much of a choice, see link below.

PHILA.GOV | Welcome to the City of Philadelphia

One extra, the land fill may accept it, but may need to see your permit and have to come from a licensed contractor. City governments have a way of closing loopholes like that.

Good Luck
Bud
 
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Old 03-27-09, 04:56 AM
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I'm not at all familiar with the process, but I thought $1200 sounded pretty reasonable myself.
 
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Old 03-27-09, 10:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Bud9051 View Post
I here you on budgets, but $1,200 really isn't a bad price. Just to remove and clean up normal siding would cost you half of that, and they are removing two layers with one being asbestos. Of course they may be getting some extra cash for the recycled aluminum .

I would rather see you save by installing the new siding yourself and leave the asbestos to the pros. Good Luck
Bud

Thanks, I am removing the aluminum myself and installing the vinyl siding myself. However, i just found out that the landfill has a two ton minumum, so it is 180 + 20 in fees, and I will have a difficult time getting it all there in one trip. In addition, the equipment will cost me almost $200. Ultimately, I am going to pay between $400-$500 to remove it myself, so I may see if I can get a little better price, but I am still on the fence as to what I am going to do.
 
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Old 03-27-09, 06:52 PM
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I am still researching my options. I have three options at this point.

1) Pay someone $1200 to remove.

2) Side over the existing asbestos

3) Remove myself and pay about $500 for safety equipment and disposal.

Question for any experts, the siding on my Levittown home, according to my research is asbestos cement AKA colorbestos. This has already been sided over once, but I am considering siding over it again.

Does anybody have any tips, suggestions, or feedback on siding over this type of product?

Thanks
 
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Old 03-27-09, 07:12 PM
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Sure. My tip is that when people "side over" that type of siding, it always obliterates the siding into little pieces, so it's going to be someone's problem someday. IMO, siding over that siding is just plain irresponsible and lazy.

Get rid of the stuff, preferably pay someone to do it so that it's their problem to be safe and dispose of it. And for heaven's sake, don't go over it with another layer of siding.
 
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Old 03-28-09, 06:32 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Sure. My tip is that when people "side over" that type of siding, it always obliterates the siding into little pieces, so it's going to be someone's problem someday. IMO, siding over that siding is just plain irresponsible and lazy.

Get rid of the stuff, preferably pay someone to do it so that it's their problem to be safe and dispose of it. And for heaven's sake, don't go over it with another layer of siding.
I called a few siding contractors I know to see if they remove this type of asbestos, and they said that they usually just side over it. They told me that this type of asbestos holds up very well. That is the reason my opinion has changed somewhat over the course of this thread. I don't know if they just side over it because they are lazy, don't want to remove it, or they believe it is the best, safest option not to disturb it.

I am curious if the asbestos siding that you have seen obliterate is the same stuff that I have. The layer of aluminum siding that I am currently removing just left nail holes in the asbestos siding, but it did not break anywhere.

Do you generally see it break as you are driving nails in it to hang the new siding?

Also, thanks for the input. Any information, tips, or precautionary advice is greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 03-28-09, 07:03 AM
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Just to note, the nail holes you are leaving may seem minor, but are disturbing the asbestos and require proper removal. If you are in Philly, the link I posted said you can't do this. I'm not trying to hit you over the head with a hammer, just trying to guide you down the correct path.

Bud
 
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Old 03-28-09, 07:14 AM
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You my be right that I am thinking of an entirely different type of siding.

The stuff we have in these parts is a variation of this design, either straight, wavy, notched, of various sizes, textures, and colors. The product below is actually fiber cement, but it looks similar to the older products that used to contain asbestos.



Image Credit: GAF

Most siding contractors side over it for several reasons. It keeps the cost of the project down so that they get the job. Most people go with the lowest bid. Lowest bid will never, ever bprovide the "best" quality options. They also don't want the hassle and liability of removing and disposing the stuff. Some probably also believe that its best and safest to leave it in place and side over it, but lots of people can "believe" something, it doesn't necessarily make it right... it is just their opinion. Just like removing it and disposing of it properly is my opinion... for all the reasons I mentioned above and to a lesser degree, for health and liability reasons. If one of your neighbors gets a burr in his saddle over "dust" coming from your house, who would you rather have responsible- a certified and insured asbestos removal company, or you and your brother in law? (hypothetically speaking)

Some siding breaks when the nails are driven thru it, but not all. The nail usually will crack the siding. In a few cases, if the nails are in a spot where the siding has solid backing behind it, the nail might punch though cleanly. It's when nails are between laps that breakage can occur. Especially when the layers are removed is it that you have the mess. If siding is removed prior to driving 1000's of nails through it you have much less breakage and the siding is much safer to remove. I guess that is a moot point if your house already has one layer over the siding shingles.
 
 

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