Attaching Hardie Trim to Brick


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Old 05-05-09, 01:32 PM
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Attaching Hardie Trim to Brick

I want to attach the bottom band trim board of my hardie plank installation to the brick foundation to get it on the same line as the trim around the porch and garage. Is this something that is being done at all? If so, how are people doing it?

Above the band board, the plank siding will be attached to the wood framing.

The reason the house foundation brick is higher than the porch foundation is because the house is going to be on a raised slab. The brick is flush with the top of the concrete floor.

Thanks for any info.
 
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Old 05-05-09, 02:55 PM
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Just a thought and pleeeeze don't assume that I know what I'm talking about, but a 100% RTV Silicone Adhesive/Sealant might just do the trick without having to anchor your trim into the brick or morter. My only concern is the weight of the hardee board, but they use RTV to hold up stuff a lot heavier. Regardless, I would suggest you call the Hardee 800 number and ask if this would work or even if they have a better suggestion. MFR's generally know their product better than anyone else and Hardee seems to know theirs pretty well.
When you find out, I'm sure others including myself would like to know what you found out. Good luck
 
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Old 05-06-09, 03:48 AM
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I don't think the RTV will withstand weather very good. How much of a setback will this molding have in relation to the other molding. If it sets back too far, it will probably look worse than a transition in elevation. You may want to post a couple of pictures on a site such as photobucket.com and copy/paste the HTML code to your reply post so we can see what you see.
 
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Old 05-06-09, 05:30 AM
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Again, I don't profess to know anything for sure and wouldn't admit it if I did, but we (my previos countertop shop) have adhered engraved 1/2 Corian sheets 30x120 to masonry walls with 100% RTV Silicone Adhesive as sub division entry signage and now 15 years later, it is still up, still in good shape and only ocassionally the lettering needs to be repainted.

The following is taken from a website a couple of minutes ago.

"SU5005 100% RTV Silicone Adhesive/Sealant is a nonslump paste-like, one part material which has excellent resistance to extreme temperature, moisture, ozone, vibration, and weathering. Useful temperature ranges: Temp. Range........ -80F (-62C) to 400F (205 C) Intermittant Temp. Range 500F (260C).
Features One-part acetoxy silicone rubber sealant. Can be applied at temperatures from -35 F (-37 C) to 140 F (60 C). Will not crack or become brittle with age. Excellent adhesion to glass, most types of wood, metal ceramics, porcelain, silicone rubber, synthetic rubbers and many plastics. Available colors are clear, white, black, aluminum, almond, bronze, etc. Excellent Marine Acetoxy RTV Silicone"

Again, I would call the Hardee 800 number and ask them what they recommend, after all they have to warrantee it.
 
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Old 05-06-09, 03:40 PM
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I guess RTV has come a long way. I was mainly concerned with the profile of the siding versus the trim boards. RTV may hold, but if I had to guarantee it, I would tapcon it into the joints.
 
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Old 05-06-09, 05:49 PM
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To add to the comments about using tapcons to fasten the hardietrim, I'd suggest you countersink phillips head tapcons into the hardietrim, then cover the holes with sealant.

As you select locations for the tapcons, drill into the mortar joints, not the brick itself, and be *very* gentle if you choose to drill anywhere in the top row of brick mortar, as the top row is the weakest layer, and a hammer drill could easily loosen an entire brick.
 
 

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