Hardi re-side - Frieze board and moulding

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Old 06-03-09, 09:24 AM
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Hardi re-side - Frieze board and moulding

Next question on the re-side project.

The gables on the house have a frieze board that I assume is probably pine. I'm planning on pulling it off with the rest of the siding, and am not sure what I want to do there. My understanding is that it only serves a decorative purpose, so if I choose not to put a replacement frieze board up it won't hurt anything, as long as there aren't unsightly gaps between the sofit and the siding. If the siding covers the gap, can I just caulk this? If I need a piece of moulding to cover the gap, is it best to put this on before the siding goes up (I would think it would look stupid to lay the moulding over the siding.)?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 06-03-09, 04:47 PM
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The frieze does provide a certain "look" but if you'd like to change the look, you can certainly remove it... provided nothing permanent is nailed on top of it, like soffit f-channel, or something. It's possible that removing it may leave an unsightly paint line or there may be a gap where the soffit meets the sheathing, which the frieze was covering.

You are correct that laying trim over the siding would look goofy, although some contractors do that for the sake of speed. You see it a lot on corner posts, and I shake my head when I see it. When the gable frieze trim is installed first (I prefer 1" thick perimeter trim rather than 3/4") it looks much better when the siding butts up under it and you have a tight fit that is caulked. One shortcut that eliminates the need for caulking (in arid climates, not wet climates) is to put up a 1" o.d. steel j-channel, and tuck the siding into that along the gable ends. The j-channel will hide any gaps where the siding meets the soffit.
 
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Old 12-18-14, 10:31 PM
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Xsleeper-

Can you provide a pciture for a visual? What do you mean by installing a 1" OD steel J channel and then tuck the lap siding along it under the soffit?

I think I'm following you, but not quite sure. Would you install the frieze board first, side it and then install the J channel between the two or put up the J channel and then slide the lap siding into it as you go up your gable end?
 
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Old 12-19-14, 07:21 AM
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Sounds like you've got it. If you want frieze, it would go up first. Normally, the siding would butt up to the bottom of the frieze and then get caulked. The angle of your cut has to be exact so as to avoid big gaps when you caulk. A siding table (like the ones by Tapco) with a sliding saw helps a lot in that regard, giving you a perfectly straight cut. Other guys who have a hard time following a line on fiber cement will just make a guide sled for their skilsaw.

If you put up a 1" j-channel, (either under the frieze or against the soffit on houses without frieze) it's thick enough to receive a double layer of siding and it will hide any ugly cuts, and you don't have to caulk it. On most houses, those areas are usually protected by soffits and never see any rain anyway. But you'd want to paint those cut ends prior to installation, in accord with mfg's recommendations.

If the home does not have an overhang, it would be important for the top edge of that j-channel to be flashed under drip edge so that water does not get behind the j-channel and siding. So if it's the type of gable end where there is no soffit and the wall goes from siding to fascia to roof, there should really be a roof drip edge that covers the siding j-channel or if there is fascia or frieze a z-flashing behind the bottom of that trim that would flash the j-channel you put underneath. If the frieze/fascia is 1 1/2" thick a 1" j-channel could be caulked to the bottom.
 
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