Pressure treated lumber for garage door frame?


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Old 09-05-09, 04:03 AM
I
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Pressure treated lumber for garage door frame?

Hello folks.

I am inexperienced when it comes to this area, so I am hoping to get some guidance.

I need to replace the wood that frames my garage door openings. (It butts against the shingles on the outside wall and the sheetrock of the inside wall.) These are 2x6 pieces of wood and the upright pieces will rest on the concrete garage floor.

I assumed that I would need to use pressure treated lumber for this exterior use since they would be exposed to the elements. Is that correct?

If so, what is the best practice for using it? I was told that it has to dry for weeks? That it would warp more than 'normal' (untreated) lumber?

If not, how should I prep 'normal' lumber for this use?

The overhead piece has a thin piece of flashing on top of it, I assume to protect from water. Should that be replaced or should it be reused? Will it come down with the wood or will it be attached to the structure?

Thanks.
I
 
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Old 09-05-09, 04:51 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'm just a painter so I won't be able to answer all your questions

General rule of thumb is anytime wood touches masonary pt should be used. Most of the garage doors/frames I've painted have been untreated wood. If you go that route it would be a good idea to oil prime the part that has contact with the concrete. It is a good idea to oil prime it all. Latex house paint can be applied over the oil base primer.

Most pt wood is bought wet. If you let it air dry first there is danger of it warping so it's best to go ahead and install it. It will shrink a little as it dries but the nails will keep it from warping.
 
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Old 09-05-09, 05:18 AM
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Thanks for the welcome. marksr. Hopefully someone else will be able to provide guidance on the stuff you didn't cover, but I have a couple of follow ups that you may be able to answer.

So, if I go with pressure treated wood, then I install it first. After letting it 'dry out' (as it is exposed to the elements) I can then apply the oil primer? How long till I can prime? How long after that till I can paint?

Will there be a problem with one side of the plank being unprimed and upainted if this is done after installation? (The side facing the structure.)

Thanks again.
 
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Old 09-05-09, 05:36 AM
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It shouldn't matter if the unexposed sides of the pt isn't primed/painted. It is a little hard to say when the pt would be ready for paint. It all depends on how wet it was when installed and the enviroment it's in after installation. If it's in a location that gets plenty of sun and wind, it will dry quicker than if it's mostly in the shade. Rain and/or high humidity will slow down the drying time, arid and windy will speed it up.

The wood might be ready for primer and paint in as little as a few weeks or it may take several months. Exterior oil base wood primers usually require 24 hrs drying time before they can be top coated. The primer can label will state the drying and recoat time. Again cool or humid conditions can extend the drying/recoat time.
 
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Old 09-05-09, 12:26 PM
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I don't mean to avoid the question, but IMO, cedar would be a better choice. When installed it should be kept about 1/8" off the surface of the cement to help prevent wicking, the gap at the bottom should be caulked.
 
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Old 09-05-09, 01:50 PM
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I assumed that I would need to use pressure treated lumber for this exterior use since they would be exposed to the elements. Is that correct?---- No, use cedar, much better, prime with latex so it can breathe, all edges. In this application, p.t. is not required. It will warp, cup, and twist as it dries and shrinks, even nailed properly, and just look ugly.

The overhead piece has a thin piece of flashing on top of it, I assume to protect from water. Should that be replaced or should it be reused? Will it come down with the wood or will it be attached to the structure? ---- leave it alone, it is not nailed the the head board. Caulk the edge of contact of the flashing on the new head before installing, not silicone. Pre-prime it as well, before installing. Caulk the top edge of the jambs where they contact the head, before installation. Do not nail down through the head into the jambs. Install as XSleeper said. You may want to trace the bottom cut angle to the new, to allow for the slope in the floor.(Not cut square).
Be safe, G
 
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Old 09-05-09, 02:01 PM
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"use cedar, much better, prime with latex so it can breathe"

It's not a good idea to use latex primer with cedar. The tannins in the cedar will bleed thru and discolor latex paint unless sealed with a good coat of oil base primer.
 
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Old 09-06-09, 02:53 AM
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Thanks to everyone that chimed in.

Yesterday, after getting marksr's reply but before seeing the rest of this advice, I went out and did the job. So the pressure treated lumber is now installed and waiting to dry. Cedar will have to wait for the next time it gets replaced. (I replaced these frames because I am getting new garage doors and it seemed like the right time to do so.)

I will caulk the gaps I left on the floor. I used some shims to keep them off the floor. I will also caulk the seam where the flashing overlaps the head, though I did not do this prior to installing. I will also apply caulk to the visible portion of the seam between the head and the jamb. (I am assuming the head is the overhead piece and the jambs are uprights, right?)

Thanks everyone. I have learned much here already.

I
 
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Old 09-06-09, 02:27 PM
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Good point, marksr. Brain was thinking latex prime the back, so it could breathe and dry. Glad someone is helping us get accurate info to the posters, thank you.
Be safe, G
 
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Old 09-06-09, 03:08 PM
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Don't forget as well G....cedar or redwood in dimensional lumber sizes is pretty much non-existent on the right coast and close to it.

Geez I wish posters would put locations....
 
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Old 09-06-09, 06:41 PM
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In the absence of cedar and redwood, SYP (southern yellow pine) would be a good 2nd choice.
 
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Old 09-07-09, 05:05 AM
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Thanks again everyone.

I added my location info in, sorry about not filling it out.

Hopefully, I will be able to do some stuff right with help from you guys.

Thanks.
I
 
 

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