Scaffolding for second floor gable end work?

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Old 10-24-09, 09:53 AM
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Scaffolding for second floor gable end work?

I'd like to do some awkward but straightforward work on the second floor gable end of my house, which is over another 1st story pitched roof (photo below). I need to add new sheathing and replace the lap cedar siding (there is currently no sheathing under the cedar lap).

As you can see from the photo, there's no way to do this from a ladder. I have no experience with scaffolding, so I have the following questions:

1) Can this be safely accessed with scaffolding?
2) Are there companies who rent and will erect scaffolding for a week or so and take it down?
3) Roughly how much would scaffolding rental/setup cost?
4) Are there other options I'm not seeing?

I've considered a boom on a trailer but I don't think I could get it close enough due to obstructions. The lawn in the left foreground is over the septic drainfield, plus it would be a very long reach from there anyway, as it would be from the back over the screen porch.

 
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Old 10-24-09, 10:05 AM
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if money is not an object:

Google Image Result for http://www.boom-lifts.com/images/genie-s80_lrg.jpg

they make them 135 feet long so reaching in your situation would not be a problem, just the expense.


How far is it from the furthest point to where you could set a boom lift? and how hiigh is the peak?

It looks like there is a driveway as well. How far from the corner of the house (under the balcony by that outcropping of brick) to that driveway?

what kind of work are you doing? A ladder can be used to reach any point of the gable. In fact, two ladders with ladder jacks and planks would be a relatively cheap set-up. there are ladders that can be used on the slope such as you have or components that can be used to adapt the ladder to the slope.
 
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Old 10-24-09, 10:38 AM
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Yes there's a circular gravel driveway just to the right of the photo.

The first floor peak is about 18 feet high, the second floor peak is 26 feet high.

From the wall corner under the balcony to the drive is about 30 feet

Distance to the first floor peak (I'm thinking it's the farthest distance) from the closest part of the driveway is about 45 feet but that's on about a 30 degree diagonal, so say 50-55 feet.

If there were a significant cost difference I could probably take out a couple of the shrubs adn park it on the lawn to the right, making the hoz. distance to the first floor peak about 35-45 feet.

Not to suggest at all that cost is no object! It has to be a good bit cheaper than having someone do it for me.

I'd be interested to know how you would access the gable end if I hired you to do the work . . .
 

Last edited by suobs; 10-24-09 at 10:54 AM.
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Old 10-24-09, 10:56 AM
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what needs to be done?

minimum message 25 letters?
ignore that last statement, and this one. I could not post just "what needs to be done?" due to a minimum length of post requirement of 25 letters.
 
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Old 10-24-09, 11:13 AM
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I went back and read what you are doing.

Here is what I would do:

basically this set up (only two ladders since it is not so wide:

Google Image Result for http://base-images.cygnuspub.com/images/Products/COND/2008/Jul/300x300/QualCraftInd_QualcraftLadderJa_COND_0.png

and using these on the ladders for the angle:

Werner Ladder - Accessories
 
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Old 10-24-09, 04:18 PM
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You could also set up a 24' ladder just under the first horizontal board of the gable, use a ladder jack and a 24' walk board to transverse across to the peak of the other roof. Not sure if you would be comfortable with that or not, but you could reach the entire span and almost reach the peak standing on the walk board.
 
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Old 11-30-11, 04:48 AM
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I have the same type issue with my house, a second-floor gable that is above and recessed from the first floor roof. The first-floor roof under the gable jets out about 3 feet and is a very steep pitch; point being I can't stand on it to replace the gable siding. I am curious about what you ended-up doing to solve Your similar dilemma. Of course I can hire out the work, but I'm a huge DIY'r. Thanks!
 
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Old 11-30-11, 03:05 PM
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Grimday,

Your best bet is probably to install roof jacks on the roof below your gable, and plank across them. For anything higher than what you can reach from the plank you will probably need to rent a lift.
 
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Old 11-30-11, 06:08 PM
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Believe it or not I still haven't done the work. I did paint the wall to hold it over in the meantime and experimented with this thing:

Provision Tools - Supplier of PiViT Ladder Tool and accessories.

See photo at far right at top of the web page which shows it on a roof. It worked well in combination with tubular levelers mounted to the ladder to fine-tune the slope. The levelers also have pivoting pads that compensate for slope. I wouldn't try this rig without tying off the base of the ladder to the wall as the photo on the web page shows, and also tying myself to an overhead anchor. I've seen a pro painter using a similar gadget in this situation. However it would NOT be safe on a pitch too steep to stand on. I haven't tried it yet with ladder jacks and walk board, but I suspect this might be dicey since the device depends on having weight pressing down from almost directly above to hold.

For a very steep roof, roof jacks are probably a good bet although you do have to pierce or remove roofing to mount them.

If you have enough space near the house a big boom on a trailer might work and would probably be the safest thing. They're not as expensive as you might think, something like $500-$1,000 depending on size for a week if I recall right. I'm planning on using one on the other side of the house where the wall is vertical from the ground later this month, but I'm not sure yet if it will work on the side of the house that I described in my first post, where the gable is above the first story roof and might require a sideways reach that's too long for a lift. I'll be trying though, but not counting on it because of various logistics including a walk and trees in the way and a drainfield I wouldn't want to put it on.

I'm an obsessive DIY also, mostly about things I've convinced myself I can do better than a hired hand.

Don't get hurt!
 

Last edited by suobs; 11-30-11 at 06:52 PM.
 

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