Fiber cement lap nailing

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Old 02-01-10, 07:16 PM
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Fiber cement lap nailing

According to installation instructions, Hardiplank lap siding should be face-nailed in high wind areas. Has anyone done this who can comment on how it looks? I would think not too good . . .
 
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Old 02-01-10, 07:23 PM
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It looks fine once painted, but you need to really have someone with a good eye running the nail gun, or the nails will be all over the place, and THAT's what looks bad. When the nails are driven as their instructions show (almost flush or head barely proud) it looks fine. But if your gun is blowing the nails too deep and you have to renail or putty holes that looks bad too. So a lot has to do with the technique of the guy nailing as to whether it looks bad or not. If you are hand nailing, then you have to worry about are hammer tracks beating up the siding.
 
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Old 02-01-10, 07:39 PM
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Speaking of nailing, the web page mentions a nail gun accessory that somehow prevents overdriving. Have you ever heard of anything like that?

Steve
 
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Old 02-01-10, 07:50 PM
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All siding nailers have a depth of drive adjustment, and unless you have lost it, they also have a no-mar rubber tip.

Some framing nailers also have a no-mar tip, but I don't regularly use a framing gun to install siding. The only thing I will use a framing gun for on a siding job is if I need to shoot 3" exterior nails, such as through 5/4 cement trim, which is about as hard as a rock.
 
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Old 02-02-10, 05:21 AM
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This wasn't a depth of drive adjustment. Sounded like something separate, like a stop under the nailhead.

My own experience is that it doesn't matter if it's set right if you hit softer wood or a knot.

What do you use, a hammer or a palm nailer?
 
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Old 02-02-10, 05:03 PM
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Never heard of anything like that for fiber-cement. I know they make something like that for vinyl siding and roofing guns though.

I have several siding guns, the Makita AN611 is my favorite. It sets them pretty consistantly. But if I had a choice, I'd rather have them slightly proud and tap them in flush with a hammer than have them driven too deep and have to fill them with caulk... AND renail.
 
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Old 02-02-10, 07:49 PM
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I just got a reply from James Hardie Co. They say it's called a "flush mount adapter" but didn't specify a manufacturer.
 
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