wood liier vs spackle


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Old 03-20-10, 10:58 AM
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wood liier vs spackle

Hello - sorry about the title which should read wood filler vs spackle
I am going to repair rotted areas which I will thoroghly clean out first. I let dry well.
Question is, would I be better with an exterior wood filler like Elmers, an exterior spackle or Bondo? I don't think I want to go as far a epoxy although I read it is strong. Too much drying time and prep work. I'm old and not well so a 'quicker' but good fix is what I'd like.
I think it is safe to say I'd be better off with wood filler than with spackle if I am going to go in 1/2" at a few spots and want adhesion and durability.
I have used Bondo in the past with good results but the mixing is pesty. If there is a good new exterior wood filler that you can put on with a knife like peanut butter, then sand, prime and paint I would like the name, please.
I read about Elmers but have not used it.
Thank you
 
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Old 03-20-10, 11:40 AM
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I think one important fact has been omitted. What KIND of rotted areas? Trim? Window sills? Door frames?

I would use different methods and materials for different things. Anything structural would be replaced of course. Has the reason WHY these items rotted been addressed?
 
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Old 03-20-10, 04:35 PM
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As Vic noted - what exactly are you wanting to repair?

Exterior spackling is only for dressing up minor defects in the substrate, it should not be used for any repairs.

I rarely make repairs since replacement is the preferred way to go although I have used Durham's rock hard putty on occasion. It is a bear to sand so it pays to apply it neatly! For any repair to last you must get back to solid wood [remove all the rot]
 
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Old 03-21-10, 08:57 AM
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wood filler

The areas to be fixed are only cosmetic like where two pieces of trim butt and are cracked. Also, some rotted wood along a piece of siding here and there. I have long since sold my table saw etc and am not too used to patch work.
I watched some videos and they seem to say that these non structural smaller type repairs can be fixed with a thorough cleaning and wood filler.
it looks like Elmers in a quart size. Goes on like peanut butter and seems to fill fairly deep holes.
Bear in mind, please, I agree replacement is the way to go but I am old and not well like years ago so I am trying to keep the blemishes looking ok -just staying out of the woods.
I wish I could do what I used to, believe me.
Question is, if you do use filler, will a product like brand x, exterior wood filler be acceptable and do you have a recommendation as to the name of such a filler?
Thank you
If replacement is all you suggest that is ok
 
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Old 03-21-10, 02:16 PM
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I don't have enough knowledge about the various wood 'fillers' meant for repairing damaged wood to recommend any of them. I've only repaired minor rot more as a favor to the customer than as a good fix. If they wanted it fixed right, I'd point them toward a decent carpenter

Where ever you have 2 pieces of wood joined together - that crack is best filled with caulking.

Some of the carpenters here have used a bit of the different products available for repairing rotted wood - hopefully one of them will post a reply


"I wish I could do what I used to, believe me"

Me too actually I can still do what I used to - it just takes me a whole heap longer
 
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Old 03-22-10, 08:27 AM
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fillers

Yes it would be nice if some guys who used fillers would post here. We'll see.
I know what you man about expansion and believe me if I were getting paid, I would replace wood so there would be no call back.
I like your comment about 'it just takes longer'.
 
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Old 03-23-10, 05:34 AM
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What I have used in the past is Minwax wood hardner followed by a waterproof type Bondo, (all body filler is not waterproof). Minwax also sells a filler but it goes on like body filler and smells like it but I can't say for sure if it's the same.
 
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Old 03-23-10, 05:42 AM
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Originally Posted by mgmine View Post
What I have used in the past is Minwax wood hardner followed by a waterproof type Bondo, (all body filler is not waterproof). Minwax also sells a filler but it goes on like body filler and smells like it but I can't say for sure if it's the same.
>>I'll be going out to a Home Depot and will check out the products you mention. I would never have thought of Minwax so I'll keep an eye out for it.
Thank you
 
 

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